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So, I have a graph of vertices which have certain weights and edges. I'm trying to find the minimum weighted vertex cover. For example if I have a vertex cover of size 10 but each node has a weight of 10, then the weight of the total cover is 100. But if I have a vertex cover of size 99 with each node of weight 1, then I would pick this cover over the previous one.

This is NP-Complete I believe, so there's no efficient algorithm, but I think even an exhaustive search would work for me because the number of nodes will be relatively small. The only way I can think to do this then would be to generate the power set of the set [1 ... n] (where each integer corresponds to a node on the graph), then test every individual set to see if it is 1) a valid vertex cover, and 2) keep track of the vertex cover of lowest weight.

But this seems horribly inefficient. Is this the best way to go about it?

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1 Answer 1

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Minimum weight vertex cover is NP-Complete so you couldn't expect better than exhaustive search in general, but you could use backtracking to find a minimum weight vertex cover, something like this :

MinCover(Graph G, List<Vertex> selectedVertices, int min)
{
   var coveredAll = covered(G,selectedVertices);
   if ( coveredAll && weight(selectedVertices) < min)
   {
       cover = selectedVertices.ToList();
       min = weight(cover);
   }
   else if (!coveredAll && weight(selectedVertices) < min)
   {
      select another unvisited vertex and add it to selectedVertices
      call MinCover
      remove the previously selected vertex from the list
   }

   return;

}
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So just to confirm, covered() returns true/false if the selected vertices are a valid vertex cover, and "the previously selected vertex" is the vertex picked two lines above? –  Shayon Saleh Aug 20 '12 at 22:13
    
@ShayonSaleh, Yes, for learning backtracking is good to see eight queen, also my answer is kind of branch and bound. –  Saeed Amiri Aug 20 '12 at 22:23

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