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We have a number of private (common) gems which we include in all of our ruby projects. We include them from GitHub, and use release tags to specify a version.

gem 'aswesome_gem', :git => 'git@github.com:evantahler/aswesome_gem.git', :tag => 'v2.0.28'

However, we have been rapidly iterating on our gems, and it is becoming a pain to keep all of our projects up to date. I would prefer not to host our own gem server (Gem in a Box, etc). The reason we use tags and not branches (:branch => 'production') is that bundler will not update the branch if it exists.

Is there an extension to bundler that would let me specify that every time bundle install is run, bundler would forcibly update the local cached copy to the branch in question (even though it might already be checked out)? I think that I essentially want to git pull on every git-based gem (which happens to be specified by a :branch) Bundler's default behavior assumes a gem is up to date if the branch exists (regardless of parity with origin).

Help?

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Oh, and to clarify: These gems are meant to always be up-to-date in all projects. Image that they are common Capistrano tools for deployment or config files –  Evan Aug 20 '12 at 21:57
    
Be aware that this it totally orthogonal to what Bundler is trying to achieve, which is a consistent, unchanging gem environment –  Gareth Aug 20 '12 at 23:13

1 Answer 1

I think you need to do bundle update to get the latest versions of your gems.

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You can also do bundle update gemname to update just a single gem. –  Cameron Martin Aug 20 '12 at 23:12
    
Ahh! Perhaps we'll try writing an extension to bundler that will bundle update gem_a gem_b before bundle install. Good tip! –  Evan Aug 21 '12 at 3:43

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