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I'm aware that the windows "directshow" headers have both C++ class definitions, as well as their "C" struct equivalents.

My question is, if I call into a C++ method (from C--ffmpeg in this case) and it returns me a class, how can I determine if the object passed to me passes the "is a" test for various interfaces? How can I cast it to its various interface methods? If that makes sense. (all from in straight C).

The example in question is, given ffmpeg's dshow layer: https://github.com/FFmpeg/FFmpeg/tree/master/libavdevice I have access to IPin's, now I want to cast them to IAMBufferNegotiation (if they implement that interface) like in this example: http://sid6581.wordpress.com/2006/10/09/minimizing-audio-capture-latency-in-directshow/

Thanks!

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so, from C, you are going to try and do the vtable lookups? –  Keith Nicholas Aug 20 '12 at 22:56
    
I'm unfamiliar so..I...think so? –  rogerdpack Aug 20 '12 at 22:58
    
Perhaps you could name a concrete example? –  bitmask Aug 20 '12 at 22:58
    
if you are unfamiliar, then basically what you are trying to do would be.... a mission! –  Keith Nicholas Aug 20 '12 at 22:59
    
@bitmask edited the question... –  rogerdpack Aug 20 '12 at 23:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Basically, I wouldn't. What I'd do is write an adapter layer in C++ that provides a C friendly interface to the C++ framework.

If you are dealing with COM objects, then you can use QueryInterface http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/13601/COM-in-plain-C

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Is it even possible in straight C? (I may go this route, if I can figure it out). –  rogerdpack Aug 20 '12 at 22:59
    
Ok thank you for the clue. This put me on the right track. Turns out that at least with these particular interfaces, you 1) need to call QueryInterface to "cast" them as a new implementation, and that, given that, it has convenience methods to call the interfaces methods, like IAMBufferNegotiation_QueryInterface gist.github.com/3409972. thanks! –  rogerdpack Aug 21 '12 at 0:40

In C++, you can attempt a dynamic cast. Let's consider a function animalAtRandom() which returns a pointer to an instance of the Animal class and you'd like to test whether it is an instance of the Dog class.

Animal *someAnimal = animalAtRandom();
Dog *rex = dynamic_cast<Dog *>(someAnimal);

if (rex == NULL)
{
    // this Animal is not a Dog
}
else
{
    // yay
}

In pure C, this won't be easy. The C++ compiler does some pointer arithmetic to land you at the right offset, so you're better off writing a C++ helper function instead:

extern "C" Dog *fetchFirstAnimalAsDog()
{
    return dynamic_cast<Dog *>(animalAtRandom());
}
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In one way I can say its not efficient until C++ provides an interface to transfer data back in a C struct.
Member arrangement inside a class is implementation defined and thus some hack to copy data of members according to some sequence fails.

However in some old hacks if you want to retrieve something like important stuff from public section of class it is suggested to do a memcpy.

 memcpy(dest_c_struct,src_c_class_ret_from_function,size_define);

But it wont leave you with anything of progressive nature.

UPDATE:

The example in question is, given ffmpeg's dshow layer: https://github.com/FFmpeg/FFmpeg/tree/master/libavdevice I have access to IPin's, now I want to cast them to IAMBufferNegotiation (if they implement that interface) like in this example:

Are you talking about C ?? Casting IPin interface to IAMBufferNegotiation??

If I am understanding correctly, then its not possible to cast one interface type to another interface in C. In fact there are no interfaces in C.Only way is to switch back to C++ or provide C friendly interface to FFmpeg library with your application.

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