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The following code shows a class which privately inherits from an interface having its private functions accessed without granting the calling object friendship. I am baffled by this but can't really see what better solution the compiler could come up with (code compiles and runs). Why does this work?

#include <iostream>

class IVisitor;

class IVisitable
{
public:
    virtual void Accept(IVisitor& visitor) const = 0;
};

class VisitableA;
class VisitableB;

class IVisitor
{
public:

    virtual void Visit(const VisitableA& a) = 0;

    virtual void Visit(const VisitableB& b) = 0;
};

class VisitableA : public IVisitable
{
public:
    virtual void Accept(IVisitor& visitor) const
    {
        visitor.Visit(*this);
    }
};

class VisitableB : public IVisitable
{
public:
    virtual void Accept(IVisitor& visitor) const
    {
        visitor.Visit(*this);
    }
};

class PrivateVisitor : private IVisitor
{
public:
    PrivateVisitor(IVisitable& v)
    {
        v.Accept(*this);    
    }

private:

    virtual void Visit(const VisitableA& a)
    {
        std::cout << "I saw A\n";
    }

    virtual void Visit(const VisitableB& b)
    {
        std::cout << "I saw B\n";
    }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
VisitableA a;
VisitableB b;

PrivateVisitor p_a(a);
PrivateVisitor p_b(b);
} 
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Access specifiers are only checked at compile time, and there they are checked on the static type of the object on which they are applied.

Inside PrivateVisitor constructor, the *this object is casted to IVisitor. In this context the type of inheritance does not matter, as we are within the PrivateVisitor type, so we have full access.

The object is used inside the IVisitable object (VisitableA or VisitableB) and the Visit member function is called. While the dynamic type of the object is PrivateVisitor, the static type is IVisitor (the reference is of type IVisitor&). Access specifiers are checked against IVisitor class where both Visit overloads are public, so the compiler accepts the call.

The fact that the function is private in the final overrider does not really matter, as access was performed through the base class, where the functions are public.

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The private that matters here, is this one:

PrivateVisitor : private IVisitor

Luckily, the only place where a PrivateVisitor is casted to a IVisitor, is the constructor:

PrivateVisitor::PrivateVisitor(IVisitable& v)
{
    v.Accept(*this);
}

And the constructor has access to the private bases of the class.

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private is at the class scope, not the object scope.

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