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If I need to assign zeros to a chunk of memory. If the architecture is 32bits can assignment of long long (which is 8 bytes on particular architecture) be more efficient then assignment of int (which is 4 bytes), or will it be equal to two int assignments? And will the assignment of int be more efficient then assignment using char for the same chunk of memory since I would need to loop 4 times as many times if I use char versus int

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Premature optimizations aside. Yes, on a 32-bit architecture, an 8-byte long long will require two assignments. But you have half as many iterations so it probably won't matter. In your case, you seem to want the functionality of memset(). So just use that instead. –  Mysticial Aug 20 '12 at 23:43
    
This doesn't answer the question directly, but you probably would be better off just using memset. It is already quite possibly optimized to do that operation. Some implementations I have looked at use architecturally "nice" assignments paying attention to byte alignment. –  Mark Wilkins Aug 20 '12 at 23:44
2  
Why not write some code to test it? Though in general working in the platform's native word-size is always the most efficient approach. –  aroth Aug 20 '12 at 23:44
1  
memset() is the way to go if you want each byte to have the same value. If you want to set the memory to something like 0x11223344, memset() won't do the trick. Unless you're doing this memory initialization a lot, it's unlikely to matter much whether int, long or long long is being used. If you do decide to optimize this, make sure to take into account alignment issues. –  Michael Burr Aug 21 '12 at 0:09
    
If you are passed a pointer to char and attempt to assign to it through a conversion to pointer to int, your program will crash on some platforms when the pointer to char is not aligned as needed for int. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 21 '12 at 2:52
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Why not use memset() ?

http://www.elook.org/programming/c/memset.html

(from above site)

Syntax:

#include <string.h>
void *memset( void *buffer, int ch, size_t count ); 

Description:

The function memset() copies ch into the first count characters of buffer, and returns buffer. memset() is useful for intializing a section of memory to some value. For example, this command:

memset( the_array, '\0', sizeof(the_array) ); 

is a very efficient way to set all values of the_array to zero.

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Standard library writers often optimize memset to the peculiarities and capabilities of the target architecture. If you're looking for efficiency, your library's memset implementation may very well be more efficient than either of the two options that the OP mentioned. –  bta Aug 21 '12 at 0:07
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To your questions, the answers would be yes and yes, if the compiler is smart/optimizes.

Interesting note that on machines that have SSE we can work with 128 bit chunks :) still, and this is just my opinion, always try to emphasize readability balanced with conciseness so yeah ... I tend to use memset, its not always perfect, and may not be the fastest but it tells the person maintaining the code "hey Im initializing or setting this array"

anyway here some test code, if it needs any corrections let me know.

#include <time.h>
#include <xmmintrin.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define NUMBER_OF_VALUES 33554432

int main()
{
    int *values;
    int result = posix_memalign((void *)&values, 16, NUMBER_OF_VALUES * sizeof(int));
    if (result)
    {
        printf("Failed to mem allocate \n");
        exit(-1);
    }
    clock_t start, end;

    int *temp = values, total = NUMBER_OF_VALUES; 
    while (total--)
        *temp++ = 0;

    start = clock();
    memset(values, 0, sizeof(int) * NUMBER_OF_VALUES);
    end = clock();

    printf("memset time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    start = clock();
    {
        int index = 0, total = NUMBER_OF_VALUES * sizeof(int);
        char *temp = (char *)values;
        for(; index < total; index++)
            temp[index] = 0;
    }
    end = clock();

    printf("char-wise for-loop array indices time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    start = clock();
    {
        int index = 0, *temp = values, total = NUMBER_OF_VALUES;
        for (; index < total; index++)
            temp[index] = 0;
    }
    end = clock();

    printf("int-wise for-loop array indices time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    start = clock();
    {
        int index = 0, total = NUMBER_OF_VALUES/2;
        long long int *temp = (long long int *)values;
        for (; index < total; index++)
            temp[index] = 0;
    }
    end = clock();

    printf("long-long-int-wise for-loop array indices time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    start = clock();
    {
       int index = 0, total = NUMBER_OF_VALUES/4;
       __m128i zero = _mm_setzero_si128();
       __m128i *temp = (__m128i *)values;
       for (; index < total; index++)
           temp[index] = zero; 
    }
    end = clock();

    printf("SSE-wise for-loop array indices time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    start = clock();
    {
        char *temp = (char *)values;
        int total  = NUMBER_OF_VALUES * sizeof(int);
        while (total--)
            *temp++ = 0;        
    }
    end = clock();

    printf("char-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    start = clock();
    {
        int *temp = values, total = NUMBER_OF_VALUES;
        while (total--)
            *temp++ = 0;
    }
    end = clock();

    printf("int-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    start = clock();
    {
        long long int *temp = (long long int *)values;
        int total = NUMBER_OF_VALUES/2;
        while (total--)
            *temp++ = 0;
    }
    end = clock();

    printf("long-ling-int-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    start = clock();
    {
        __m128i zero = _mm_setzero_si128();
        __m128i *temp = (__m128i *)values;
        int total = NUMBER_OF_VALUES/4;
        while (total--)
            *temp++ = zero;
    }
    end = clock();

    printf("SSE-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time %f\n", ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);


    free(values);
    return 0;
}

here are some tests:

$ gcc time.c
$ ./a.out 
memset time 0.025350
char-wise for-loop array indices time 0.334508
int-wise for-loop array indices time 0.089259
long-long-int-wise for-loop array indices time 0.046997
SSE-wise for-loop array indices time 0.028812
char-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time 0.271187
int-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time 0.072802
long-ling-int-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time 0.039587
SSE-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time 0.030788

$ gcc -O2 -Wall time.c
MacBookPro:~ samyvilar$ ./a.out 
memset time 0.025129
char-wise for-loop array indices time 0.084930
int-wise for-loop array indices time 0.025263
long-long-int-wise for-loop array indices time 0.028245
SSE-wise for-loop array indices time 0.025909
char-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time 0.084485
int-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time 0.025277
long-ling-int-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time 0.028187
SSE-wise while-loop pointer arithmetic time 0.025823

my info:

$ gcc --version
i686-apple-darwin10-gcc-4.2.1 (GCC) 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)
Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

$ uname -a
Darwin MacBookPro 10.8.0 Darwin Kernel Version 10.8.0: Tue Jun  7 16:33:36 PDT 2011; root:xnu-1504.15.3~1/RELEASE_I386 i386

memset is quite optimize probably using inline assembly though again this varies from compiler to compiler ...

gcc seems to be optimizing quite aggressively when giving -O2 some of the timings start converging I guess I should take a look at the assembly.

If you are curios just call gcc -S -msse2 -O2 -Wall time.c and the assembly is at time.s

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You should run the memset() twice, because otherwise as the first thing to touch those pages it's going to take all the faults to instantiate them. –  caf Aug 21 '12 at 11:57
    
@caf thank you! I've updated the code with a simple loop to initialize the array, didn't want to call memset twice in case it would be cached making unfair for the other comparisons, still its insanely fast, Im going though the assembly ... –  Samy Vilar Aug 21 '12 at 22:43
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1. long long(8 bytes) vs two int(4 bytes) - Its better to go for long long. Because performance will be good in assigning one 8byte element rather than two 4 byte element.

2. int (4 bytes) vs four char(1 bytes) - Its better to go for int here.

If you are declaring only one element then you can directly assign zero like below.

long long a;
int b;
....
a = 0; b = 0;

But if you are declaring array of n elements then go for memeset function like below.

long long a[10];
int b[20];
....
memset(a, 0, sizeof(a));
memset(b, 0, sizeof(b));

If you want initalize during declaration itself, then no need of memset.

long long a = 0;
int b = 0;

or

long long a[10] = {0};
int b[20] = {0};
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Assignment optimizations are done on most architectures so they are aligned to the word size which is 4 bytes for 32 bit x86. So assigning memory of the same size doesn't matter (no difference between memset of 1MB worth of longs and 1MB worth of char types).

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Always avoid additional iterations in higher-level programming languages. Your code will be more efficient if you just iterate once over the int, instead of looping over its bytes.

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