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I have a shell script with few Perl scripts and few Perl oneliners. Few Perl scripts in the shell script have oneliners in the begining which i have used through system. These scripts and oneliners have to take a common input. So is there a way to give argument values in the command line of shell scripts???

#!/bin/sh
perl test.pl
perl -ne 'print if/XXXX/ig../ZZZZZ/ig' abc.l > def.l
perl trial.pl
perl qwerty.pl

Here for example if the file abc.l used in the oneliner is the common input for test.pl and trial.pl, can I use a argument value so that I can give it in the command line to be used by the required code in the shell script????

I had tried to assign argument for a Perl oneliner but the input wasn’t accepted.

My test.pl code is as follows

system( q( perl -ne '/^.QQQ/ig && print' abc.l > data1.l) );
system( q( perl -ne '/.SSS/ig && print' data1.l > data2.l) );
open(fh,"<data3.l");
open(fh1,">>data31.l");

while (my $string =<fh>)
{
...
..
..

My test.pl also takes the same input abc.l.

Can anyone help me on this?

  1. How can I use ARGV in Perl oneliners???
  2. How can I give my input in command line while running the shell script???

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
3  
Please ask your question in a way that makes some sense. –  hobbs Aug 21 '12 at 0:44
    
(1)Can I use ARGV in perl oneliners???... (2) Can I give my input in command line while running the Shell script??? –  unkaitha Aug 21 '12 at 1:22
    
If you're using a system call, you probably want to interpolate your the arguments you're passing to it. –  vol7ron Aug 22 '12 at 4:07

3 Answers 3

The arguments to a shell script are $1, $2, etc. You can use them as is or assign them to variables like so:

FILE=$1
perl trial.pl $FILE
share|improve this answer

I believe you are looking for $@ to pass along the parameters:

Setup:

run_me

#!/bin/sh
perl test.pl $@
perl test2.pl $@

test.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl
print "test.pl: @ARGV\n\n";

test2.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl
print "test2.pl: @ARGV\n\n";

Example Run:

%> ./run_me foo bar foobar
test.pl: foo bar foobar

test2.pl: foo bar foobar

Edit/Update

Here for example if the file "abc.l" used in the oneliner is the common input for test.pl and trial.pl, can i use a argument value so that i can give it in the command line to be used by the required code in the shell script????

I think you don't understand what's going on in the above. "run_me" is your shell script and we are passing three values ("foo", "bar", "foobar") to it. We are then passing those values to the perl scripts using $@. If you wanted to specify the parameter being passed, instead of passing all the values to the perl script, you would use $n, where n is an integer. So to pass "bar" to the perl script you would use $2.

Given your example:

#!/bin/sh
perl test.pl $1
perl -ne 'print if/XXXX/ig../ZZZZZ/ig' $1 > def.l
perl trial.pl
perl qwerty.pl

Call your script: ./shell_script abc.1
abc.1 should be passed to test.pl and to your one-liner

share|improve this answer
    
this really helps but what if the test.pl have an oneliner to accept the input data in the begining???? I am not able to give @ARGV in oneliner . –  unkaitha Aug 21 '12 at 7:51
    
The @ARGV is used w/in perl, to send to the perl one liner (w/in the shell script) use the $@. I may not be understanding you correctly, so you might want to give an example. –  vol7ron Aug 21 '12 at 13:14
    
i have edited my post wherein i have put my sample code. It would be nice if u give an example for the oneliner thing u have commented about –  unkaitha Aug 22 '12 at 0:07
    
Updated the answer –  vol7ron Aug 22 '12 at 4:06

Perl uses the array @ARGV that contains the value of each shell parameter:

$ perl -e 'print join (":", @ARGV) . "\n" ;' this is a test
this:is:a:test

As you can see, all the arguments on the command line were picked up in @ARGV.

$ perl -e 'print "$ARGV[2]\n" ;' one two three four
three

This printed out the third parameter (since @ARGV count starts at 0).

Does this answer your question?


Addendum

EDIT : My test.pl code is as follows

system( q( perl -ne '/^.QQQ/ig && print' abc.l > data1.l) );
system( q( perl -ne '/.SSS/ig && print' data1.l > data2.l) );
open(fh,"<data3.l");
open(fh1,">>data31.l");

while (my $string =<fh>) {
...

Why not simply leave out the system statements, and munge your data only once:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

open my $input_file, "<", "abc.1";
open my $output_file ">>", "data31.l"
while ( my $string = <$input_file> ) {
    chomp $string;

    # These skip over the lines you don't want
    # No need to "prep" your input first

    next unless $string =~ /^.QQQ/i;
    next unless $string =~ /.SSS/ig;
    # Here be dragons
    say $ouput_file "$something";
}
close $input_file;
close $output_file;

This is easier to understand. You no longer have the dependence upon the system commands, you're not creating a bunch of temporary files, and it's way more efficient since you only go through each line once.


Addendum II

Thats a good idea but i have lot of such oneliners and i am not sure if my code will work after converting the oneliners into codes.So is their ANY chance of doing it with the way i asked?????

If I understand you correctly, you want a way to use those standard inline programs, that you apparently cut and paste in your script, and then somehow pass the fourth argument into your main Perl program.

The answer would be no. The system command spawns a shell to run the command in a forked process. Any Perl variables in that forked process are inaccessible to the parent. You could use Perl variables in your inline programs, and those variables could be set in the main program.

my $file1 = "data1.1";
my $file2 = "data2.1"
system qq( perl -ne '/^.QQQ/ig && print' abc.l > $file1 );
system qq( perl -ne '/.SSS/ig && print' $file1 >$file2; );

However, if this is something you're constantly doing, then I'd highly recommend you create your own packages:

use local::fix_files qw(fix_QQQ fix_SSS);

fix_QQQ ( "abc.1", "data1.1" );
fix_SSS ( "data1.1", "data2.1 );
share|improve this answer
    
This answers 50% of my question... If this oneliner is used inside a perl code then can I give in command line as "perl test.pl one two three four" –  unkaitha Aug 21 '12 at 6:39
    
I see what you're doing with the system command. Why not simply put the system command code in your program? See above. –  David W. Aug 21 '12 at 14:42
    
Thats a good idea but i have lot of such oneliners and i am not sure if my code will work after converting the oneliners into codes.So is their ANY chance of doing it with the way i asked????? –  unkaitha Aug 22 '12 at 0:20

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