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I have a piece of code and some errors and warnings, I could not understand why they occur. Could you give me your advice?

The first:

#pragma once

#include "Vector3.h"
#include <vector>

#include <GL/glew.h>

class BoundingSphere
{
public:
    float radius;
    Vector3 center;
    BoundingSphere(float radius, Vector3 center) : radius(radius),center(center) {};
    BoundingSphere() {};
};

class TriangleFace;

class MeshVertex
{

private:
    Vector3 position; 
    std::vector<TriangleFace *> faces;
    Vector3 normal;
    bool normalUpdateNeeded;

public:

    unsigned int index;

    MeshVertex(void);
    MeshVertex(Vector3 position);
    ~MeshVertex(void);

    Vector3 &getPos() {return position;};
    void addFace(TriangleFace *face);
    const std::vector<TriangleFace*>& getFaces() {return faces;  };
    Vector3 getNormal();

    void setPos(Vector3 & pos) {position = pos; }
    bool isSurfaceParticle() {return faces.size()>0;}
    void updateNormal();
};

class TriangleFace
{
private:
    Vector3 normal;
    bool normalUpdateNeeded;

public:
    MeshVertex* particles[3];
    TriangleFace(void);
    TriangleFace(MeshVertex *p1, MeshVertex *p2, MeshVertex *p3);
    MeshVertex& operator[](int i) {  return *(particles[i]); }
    Vector3 getNormal();
    ~TriangleFace(void);
    void updateNormal();
};

class TriangleMesh
{
protected:
    std::vector<MeshVertex> particles;
    std::vector<TriangleFace> faces;

public:
    TriangleMesh(string filename);
    ~TriangleMesh(void);

    void reserveNumberOfFaces(unsigned int n) { faces.reserve(n); };
    void addFace(TriangleFace &f) {faces.push_back(f);};
    void addFace(MeshVertex *p1, MeshVertex *p2, MeshVertex *p3) {faces.push_back(TriangleFace(p1,p2,p3));};

    std::vector<TriangleFace>& getFaces() {return faces;};
    std::vector<MeshVertex>& getParticles() { return particles; };

    void updateNormals();

    BoundingSphere getBoundingSphere();
};


class RenderTriangleMesh
{
private: 
    TriangleMesh &m;

    GLuint vboid[2];

    GLfloat *vertices;
    GLfloat *normals;

public:
    RenderTriangleMesh(TriangleMesh &m);
    void draw();

private:
    void generateVBOs();
    void updateVBOs();

};

Errors:

error C2220: warning treated as error - no 'object' file generated

warning C4512: 'RenderTriangleMesh' : assignment operator could not be generated

And the other:

 virtual short SimpleAddOK(const GeneralMatrix* gm) { return 0; }

error :

error C2220: warning treated as error - no 'object' file generated

warning C4100: 'gm' : unreferenced formal parameter

share|improve this question
1  
The code you have posted doesn't seem to match up with your error messages (there aren't even 25 lines in the code you posted). Can you show the code you wrote, rather than code from the standard library? – Greg Hewgill Aug 21 '12 at 1:50
    
Your title "error C2143 ; error C2059 ; error C2143 ;error C2447" would be meaning only to someone intimately familiar with MS Visual Studio who happens to have memorized its error numbers. Other compilers don't use those numbers. The text of the messages, such as "syntax error : missing ';' before 'string'", is much more meaningful -- though you probably don't need to say more than "syntax error" in your title. – Keith Thompson Aug 21 '12 at 2:07
    
I have edited my questions,Thanks – user1001738 Aug 21 '12 at 2:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first is saying that the compiler could not generate an assignment operator. This happens because of your reference member, as references cannot be reseated:

struct foo
{
    int& i;
};

int x, y;
foo f = { x };
foo g = { y };

f = g; // ??? 

You can silence the warning by explicitly disabling it yourself:

struct foo
{
    int& i;

private:
    foo& operator=(const foo&); // declared but never defined
};

That's an old trick to make the assignment operator unusable, but stops the compiler from generating it.

In C++11, you can do this:

struct foo
{
    int& i;

private:
    foo& operator=(const foo&) = delete;
};

which is more explicit and much less hacky.


The other is because you never used your argument, which can often be an error in program logic. You should probably remove its name if you don't use it:

virtual short SimpleAddOK(const GeneralMatrix* /* gm */) { return 0; } 

Personally I delete it completely. Others do this:

virtual short SimpleAddOK(const GeneralMatrix* gm)
{
    (void)gm; // this "uses" gm

    return 0;
} 

It's sometimes wrapped in a macro called USE:

#define USE(x) (void)x

virtual short SimpleAddOK(const GeneralMatrix* gm)
{
    USE(gm);

    return 0;
} 

I consider these inferior to simply deleting the name, because if the warning is actually correct (that is, you do have a flaw in your program and aren't seeing it), you're masking the warning, defeating the purpose.

Warnings should always be fixed, not silenced.

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