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considering that fairly static data should not be re-evaluated but cached instead, I wondered if it is possible to use Reflection to obtain class properties once, and then cache them so that I could dynamically evaluate object properties and read/assign values, but not have the Reflection overhead every time I do that. Is this possible (Sample code?) ?

To clarify a bit, lets say I have this class:

public class Cloud
{
     Boolean IsWhite;
}

and I'm trying to now make a method that allows me to do something like this (pseudocode):

Update(myCloudInstance, new {IsWhite, true});

Update should now check with the cache first if it knows already the properties of Cloud (typeof(myCloudInstance)), and then use cached information to assign the property "IsWhite" the value "true" instead of doing Reflection again.

Any ideas on how to do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's not clear exactly what you're doing, but caching can certainly make a difference with reflection.

In particular, if you're invoking methods (or property getters/setters) and can do so in a type-safe way as far as the calling code is concerned, it can make a huge difference if you convert the MethodInfo into a strongly-typed delegate once and then reuse that.

If you could give us a complete example of what you're trying to do, that would help us to come up with more specific ideas or even code. If you're just going to cache a PropertyInfo that may not have as much (or any) effect - it's possible that the normal Type.GetProperty (etc) methods are already pretty fast. As ever with performance questions, the key is to measure what you're actually doing. Make a change and measure again, etc.

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Your answer hinted me in the right direction (how to cache PropertyInfo) which is actually faster than GetProperty (didnt time it yet, but responsiveness of my page appears improved.) –  Alex Jul 30 '09 at 6:39
    
If you can cache delegates to call the property in a type-safe way, that may well make it faster again. Definitely time it though... –  Jon Skeet Jul 30 '09 at 6:51

I created a hashtable to cache the reflection results. First time, it's neccessary to make a call to GetProperties and store the results into the hastable. Next times, first check the hashtable for the List of PropertyInfo objects. If exists, use it. If not, invoke GetProperties.

I use this to map a datareader to a List of Entities.

My implementation is based on: A Defense on Reflection in .Net, by Nick Harrison (http://www.simple-talk.com/dotnet/.net-framework/a-defense-of-reflection-in-.net/).

So, there it is:

public class MapeadorDataReaderListaObjetos
{

private Hashtable properties;

private Hashtable Properties
{
    get
    {
        if (properties == null)
            properties = new Hashtable();
        return properties;
    }

    set { properties = value; }
}

private void LoadProperties(object targetObject, Type targetType)
{
    var flags = BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly| BindingFlags.Instance| BindingFlags.Public;

    if (properties == null)
    {
        List<PropertyInfo> propertyList = new List<PropertyInfo>();
        PropertyInfo[] objectProperties = targetType.GetProperties(flags);
        foreach (PropertyInfo currentProperty in objectProperties)
        {
            propertyList.Add(currentProperty);
        }
        properties = new Hashtable();
        properties[targetType.FullName] = propertyList;
    }

    if (properties[targetType.FullName] == null)
    {
        List<PropertyInfo> propertyList = new List<PropertyInfo>();
        PropertyInfo[] objectProperties = targetType.GetProperties(flags);
        foreach (PropertyInfo currentProperty in objectProperties)
        {
            propertyList.Add(currentProperty);
        }
        properties[targetType.FullName] = propertyList;
    }
}


public void MapearDataReaderListaObjetos <T> (IDataReader dr, List<T> Lista) where T: new()
{
    Type businessEntityType = typeof(T);
    List<T> entitys = new List<T>();
    T miObjeto = new T();
    LoadProperties(miObjeto, businessEntityType);
    List<PropertyInfo> sourcePoperties = Properties[businessEntityType.FullName] as List<PropertyInfo>;

    while (dr.Read())
    {
        T newObject = new T();
        for (int index = 0; index < dr.FieldCount; index++)
        {
            for (int _indice = 0; _indice < sourcePoperties.Count; _indice++)
            {
                if (sourcePoperties[_indice].Name.ToUpper() == dr.GetName(index).ToUpper())
                {
                    string _tipoProp = sourcePoperties[_indice].PropertyType.ToString();
                    PropertyInfo info = sourcePoperties[_indice] as PropertyInfo;
                    if ((info != null) && info.CanWrite)
                    {
                        info.SetValue(newObject, dr.GetValue(index), null);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        entitys.Add(newObject);
    }
    dr.Close();
    Lista = entitys;
}

}

Then, I call it from my DataAcces Layer, like this:

public List <Entities.ENFactura> ListaxIdFactura (SqlTransaction Tr, Entities.ENFactura oBEFactura)
{

    SqlConnection Cn = new SqlConnection(); 
    Cn = _Connection.ConexionSEG();

    List<Entities.ENFactura> loBEFactura = new List<Entities.ENFactura>();

    using (Cn)
    {
        Cn.Open();

        SqlDataReader drd = (odaSQL.fSelDrd(Cn, Tr, "Pa_CC_Factura_Listar_x_IdProveedor", oBEFactura));

        if (drd != null)

        {
            if (drd.HasRows)

            {

            mapeador.MapearDataReaderListaObjetos <ENFactura>(drd, loBEFactura);

            }
        }
    }

    return (loBEFactura);
}

So, this way, the DAL gets a datareader, map it to a list of business entities, and return it to the Business Logic Layer.

This class (MapeadorDataReaderListaObjetos) has some issues still, particularly at:

info.SetValue(newObject, _valor, null);

newObject and _valor must be the same type or you'll get an exception (conversion from System.Int64 to System.Int32, in case your entity property is Int32 and its corresponding field at the database table is bigint, for example).

Also, if an entity property is another entity, this will not work, because datareaders do not return entity objects.

Obviously, this can be improved.

Regarding reflection and delegates, i found this article: Reflection - Slow or Fast? Demonstration with Solutions, by Abhishek Sur, at http://www.abhisheksur.com/2010/11/reflection-slow-or-faster-demonstration.html

Another good article is: Dodge Common Performance Pitfalls to Craft Speedy Applications, by Joel Pobar, at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163759.aspx.

Hope this helps.

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The cost of reflection does not need to be as big as you think. In addition to delegates (that Jon discusses) you can also use things like HyperDescriptor to minimise the cost of reflection without changing the code much - it simply becomes PropertyDescriptor instead:

PropertyDescriptorCollection props = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(myCloudInstance);
// ideally cache props, but not essential

then

object val = props["IsWhite"].GetValue(myCloudInstance);

or if you use it lots, consider storing the PropertyDescriptor somewhere, too.

However... like Jon, I'm really not 100% sure what you're trying to do!

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I think the best way to do it is to get the getter or setter method, convert it to a delegate, and work with the delegate, there is no faster way:

PropertyInfo propertyInfoProperty1 = type.GetType().GetProperty("Property1");
Func<TYPE, string> get_Property1 = (Func<TYPE, string>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<TYPE, string>), propertyInfoProperty1.GetGetMethod());

Then call the getter method:

string value = get_Property1(type);

You can cache the delegates.

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Dynamic assembly should help with the concern about reflection performance. Somebody has implemented property assessors using dynamic assembly here.

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