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I'm trying to log the terminal display produced by a script which contains a Scipy optimization routine. I've tried three different ways, all with disappointing results.

open() and cmd-prompt redirection (">") did not log the warnings nor the per-iteration information I would like to keep track of; it only logged the parameter solutions.

logging.basicConfig() produced a blank file.

If possible, I would like to be able to log the exact terminal display of a script file. I've begun looking into using the logging module, but it seems pretty complex for what I would think is a very basic task (I'm coming from a Matlab background).

Environment:

. Python 2.7.3

. Operating Systems: Windows Vista and XP

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Probably the stuff you're interested in is being sent to stderr rather than stdout. Try redirecting both to a file. You can either do that in Python:

import sys

with open("log.txt", "w") as logfile:
    sys.stdout, sys.stderr = logfile, logfile

    # do your stuff here, e.g. import the module that you want to log

Or from the command line:

python myscript.py > log.txt 2>&1
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1  
The first method might not work if some scipy code prints from C(++) rather than going through Python printing channels (which is possible, idk). This approach gets around that on Unix; not sure if it works on Windows. –  Dougal Aug 21 '12 at 3:46
    
Good point. You could of course use subprocess to run a separate Python instance and get around that, but at that point it's going to be easier to do it with the command line... –  kindall Aug 22 '12 at 19:35
    
both options seemed to work in my case. Thanks. –  beets Aug 22 '12 at 23:24

Take a look at linux script command. It saves everything that is printed in your terminal.

user@host:~ $ script
Script started, file is typescript
user@host:~ $ ls
bin  Documents  Pictures  Videos
user@host:~ $ exit # ^D stops script
Script done, file is typescript

Then, the result is in a file named typescript.

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Sorry, did not see It was a Windows environment. –  stummjr Aug 21 '12 at 2:31

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