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I'm trying to learn perl and in particular use the File::Find module to search through a directory tree of pictures to see if any filenames already existing match those on a camera. If the filename is there, I'll assume the file has already been transferred from this camera and won't process it any further. If the filename is not found, I'd like to take some sort of action on the file.

I've used find2perl to create a basic structure and it works for finding the file. But I can't seem to find a way to tell if the find failed. The File::Find::find doesn't seem to return any value to act upon, and I'm not sure how to act upon, or use any return value from the '&wanted' subdirectory that it's using.

What is the optimal method of determining if the File::Find::find was not successful in finding any matching files? Should I use a global flag variable that is set to a certain value at the top of the program and is only changed if the find is successful? I guess I could check that value after the find to see if it has changed (success) or not (nothing found).

Any ideas or suggestions?

Here's the basic structure:

  # Traverse desired filesystems
  File::Find::find({wanted => \&wanted}, '/files/multimedia/pictures/');
  exit;


  sub wanted {
      my ($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid);

     if ( (($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid) = lstat($_)) && /^$ARGV[0]\z/si ) {
        print("found: $name\n");
        }
     }
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p3rl.org/Path::Class::Rule has a much better API than File::Find –  daxim Aug 24 '12 at 17:45

1 Answer 1

If no desired files are found, the wanted subroutine will not be called.

What I usually do is exactly what you suggested - set a flag to false before calling find, and have wanted set it to true.

That's in cases where I actually need to know that information - I haven't actually needed it for quite a while.

In fact, a count may be better than a flag since it delivers more information. The following code:

use File::Find;

sub wanted {
    my ($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid);
    $quant += 1;
    if ( (($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid) = lstat($_)) && /^$ARGV[0]\z/si ) {
        print("found: $name\n");
    }
}

$quant = 0;
File::Find::find({wanted => \&wanted}, '/nosuchdir');
print ("Found $quant files in /nosuchdir\n");

$quant = 0;
File::Find::find({wanted => \&wanted}, '/tmp');
print ("Found $quant files in /tmp\n");

generates the following output on my system:

Found 0 files in /nosuchdir
Found 39 files in /tmp

That way, a $count of zero means that no files were found, anything else tells you that there were files (and also tells you how many).

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