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I'd like to generate a random number with each digit being in range from 0-9 and not repeating itself. Assume finite length of 4.

  • 1234 qualifies, each composite digit is unique.
  • 1123 does not, 1 is repeated

How can this be done please?

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1  
The digits shouldn't be repeated within the number, or the number itself should be different from any previously generated number? –  jogojapan Aug 21 '12 at 3:46
1  
<random> is a good start. –  chris Aug 21 '12 at 3:47
    
@jogojapan, I'd like for each number in the list to be different: 1234 qualifies. 1123 does not –  James Leonard Aug 21 '12 at 3:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To generate the digits:

std::vector<int> vec = {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9}; // or initialize from array if not c++11
std::random_shuffle(vec.begin(), vec.end());
vec.resize(4);

And to join the digits into a single number:

int number = 0;
for (auto i = vec.begin(); i != vec.end(); ++i) {
    number = 10 * number + (*i);
}
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4  
I would just use an array from the start, std::vector<int> gains us nothing here. But good answer! Also note this may give a leading zero, which reduces to a three digit number. –  GManNickG Aug 21 '12 at 3:58
    
I wish we had Python's random.sample in C++ :) –  Kos Aug 21 '12 at 4:02
    
This is great, but for some reason same numbers are always generated: 7 3 1 9, 6 3 5 1 , 7 2 0 5 , 6 0 5 9 , 8 7 1 3 –  James Leonard Aug 21 '12 at 4:03
2  
@JamesLeonard: Well, did you seed your random number generator? –  GManNickG Aug 21 '12 at 4:05
1  
Thanks srand ( time(NULL) ); did the trick –  James Leonard Aug 21 '12 at 4:07

I believe you are talking about generating permutations.

Try something like this:

int used[10] = {0};
int n = 0;
int number = 0;

while( n < 10 ) {
    int d = rand() % 10;
    if( used[d] ) continue;
    used[d] = 1;
    number = number * 10 + d;
    n++;
}

Not the most efficient... It simply tracks what digits have been used, and rerolls any time a used digit is encountered.

The above does have the side-effect that zero is technically not used if it's the first number chosen. You could explicitly prevent this, or simply accept that some numbers will be 9 digits long.

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hmm, your question changed after answers were given. I'm sure you can adapt accordingly. –  paddy Aug 21 '12 at 3:58
    
@pst yes, I acknowledged that. I like the answer using STL. Didn't know about that function. Another approach is to generate an array of 0-9, and then swap random pairs of digits multiple times. –  paddy Aug 21 '12 at 3:59

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