Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to do something like this,

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct Id {
    int _age;
    char _name[10];
} Id;

int main()
{
    Id id = {10, "logan"};
    printf("%u\n", (size_t)id);  // Here is the problem.
}

The above code can't compile by gcc, anything wrong?

The reason why I'm doing this

Well, to tell the truth, I'm reading the code written by someone else, and what I did in the post is pretty much what the someone did in the code I'm reading. I can't even believe that will work, so I just try it myself. Moreover, I'm just using the lib compiled from the code, I'm not compiling the code at all. So I wonder if some compilation flags are set?

UPDATE

At someone's request, I post a screenshot of the code I saw, here it is. enter image description here

In this template, I say _Key may be a user defined struct.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by CyberSpock, AnT, Keith Thompson, j0k, Ja͢ck Aug 22 '12 at 6:39

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
why do you want to convert a struct to size_t? –  Gang Yin Aug 21 '12 at 4:52
6  
Perhaps you intended to use sizeof on the struct? –  Jerry Coffin Aug 21 '12 at 4:52
    
and id should be declared as struct Id –  CyberDem0n Aug 21 '12 at 4:53
1  
@Alcott: What you have in your sample code can't possibly work. No way. You claim you saw something like that in someone else's code? You must have misinterpreted that someone else's code somehow. They were doing something different. Not this. Post a sample from the actual code you are reading, if possible. –  AnT Aug 21 '12 at 5:18
1  
@behnam: I seriously doubt that that's what the OP wants to do. It would be much simpler to write printf("%d\n", id._age);. I suggest that guessing at the OP's intent is not useful until the OP comes back and shows us some real code. –  Keith Thompson Aug 21 '12 at 5:45

4 Answers 4

The screenshot struct xhash code you posted is C++ code, not C code.

However, while it is generally possible to make it work for class types in C++, I still very much doubt that this C++ code was even supposed to be used with class types. I would guess that the posted C++ struct xhash implementation is intended to be used as "fallback" implementation for scalar types only, while class types are required to provide their own implementations for hashing functor (by using template specialization mechanism, for example, or by defining completely different hashing functors for themselves).

Meanwhile, in C none of this makes sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so in C++, this might compile? –  Alcott Aug 21 '12 at 7:21
    
@Alcott: An instantiation of xhash with a scalar type would compile. An instantiation with a non-scalar type would not. –  Keith Thompson Aug 21 '12 at 9:40
    
@KeithThompson, which means if _Key is an struct, then it wouldn't compile, right? –  Alcott Aug 21 '12 at 10:29
    
@Alcott: Yes... –  Keith Thompson Aug 21 '12 at 10:32

Update with keith's comment:

If you want to print age, you can(but behaviour is not defined,just implementation specific hack)

 int main() 
{     Id id = {10, "logan"}; 
    printf("%u\n", *((size_t*)((void*)&id)));  
}

To print size of ID,(returned type is size_t)

 int main() 
{     Id id = {10, "logan"}; 
    printf("%u\n",sizeof(id));  
}

Include stddef.h in your header.

C defines size_t as:-

size_t which is the unsigned integer type of the result of the sizeof operator;

share|improve this answer
    
That's not the problem. size_t is also defined in <stdio.h>. The problem is that you can't convert a struct to an integer. –  Keith Thompson Aug 21 '12 at 5:18
    
@KeithThompson:- Updated , pls suggest... –  perilbrain Aug 21 '12 at 5:36
1  
So you take the address of id, convert it to void*, then convert that result to size_t*, and dereference the result. In effect, you're type-punning, treating the first few bytes of id as if they were a size_t object. This is extremely unlikely to be useful; note, for example, that int and size_t are not necessarily the same size. If you want to print id._age, just print id._age. And there's no indication that this is what the OP is looking for; we won't know that until the OP updates the question. –  Keith Thompson Aug 21 '12 at 5:42

struct Id is a struct type. size_t is an integer type. There is no conversion from struct types to integer types. See N1570 6.5.4p2, "Cast operators":

Unless the type name specifies a void type, the type name shall specify atomic, qualified, or unqualified scalar type, and the operand shall have scalar type.

(Emphasis added.)

It's conceivable that a compiler might support such conversions as a language extension, but it's unlikely; I can't think of any reasonable semantics for it.

Reexamine the code you're working with. Either it doesn't compile (and you need to address that problem), or it does compile because it's not really doing that kind of conversion.

Oh, and don't define identifiers starting with an underscore; most of them are reserved to the implementation. age and name are perfectly good names; no need to call them _age and _name.

share|improve this answer

I think, if you want the size of that structure, you might want to use sizeof(id), which returns a value of type size_t.

What you're attempting to do at the moment is to cast that structure to a size_t type, something that won't really work that well, if at all :-)

In other words:

printf("%zu\n", sizeof(id));  // Here is the solution.

In addition (as you'll notice), the standard-blessed way of printing size_t values is with the z modifier:

z: Specifies that a following d, i, o, u, x, or X conversion specifier applies to a size_t or the corresponding signed integer type argument; or that a following n conversion specifier applies to a pointer to a signed integer type corresponding to size_t argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, to tell the truth, I'm reading the code written by someone else, and what I did in the post is pretty much what the someone did in the code I'm reading. I can't even believe that will work, so I just try it myself. Moreover, I'm just using the lib compiled from the code, I'm not compiling the code at all. So I wonder if some compilation flags are set? –  Alcott Aug 21 '12 at 5:00

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.