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I am concerned about the installation path used by my software. When I design a piece of software, is it my duty to specify that the software will be installed on a specific path, or it is the duty of the operating system to decide that all software be installed on one path?

For example, on Linux, are you to specify in to your code that the installation path is /usr/bin/vosMediaServer.exe, or this is the work of the operating system to put all software on a defined/default installation path?

Is it the duty of us programmers to make our software know where they should go when being installed?

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closed as not constructive by John Saunders, Juhana, Tim Post Aug 22 '12 at 8:39

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Thanks for the editing. But i just want to package my simple media server which we shall use in class –  Wangolo Joel Aug 21 '12 at 5:23
    
Ideally, it's more or less up to the user (IMHO), and since this more or less will just gather opinions - it's not really constructive enough for SO. –  Tim Post Aug 22 '12 at 8:39

2 Answers 2

Actually you define the installation path of your program in your installer .

If you have a 3rd party install maker then it surely shows the default installation path for your program.

But the user can also change the default installation path

To change the default installation path in windows,one can just follow the below steps:

  1. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion.

  2. At the right panel, look for ProgramFilesDir.

  3. Double click on it to change the value to your desired path. For example, change the value from C:\Program Files to D:\Softwares.

  4. Click OK to save the setting.

Once above steps are completed, the default installation path has been changed to your desired path whenever you install any new applications.

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Ok. So when writing the installer that's when you put the installation path. thanks –  Wangolo Joel Aug 21 '12 at 6:12
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Here are some free install creator if you want: Install Creator or try Clickteam Install Creator –  R41nB0w M47r1z Aug 21 '12 at 6:30
    
Thanks for this links –  Wangolo Joel Aug 21 '12 at 6:48

Like so many things the only real answer is "it depends".

Your question is tagged both "Windows" and "Linux". Practices differ between these operating systems, in part because Linux is actually a set of operating systems, each with a slightly different way of handling configuration and the software packaging and installation process. When writing open source software, you should build "installer" style functionality into what you release, but you should not rely on particular paths or installation processes for the software to run.

For example, FreeBSD's ports system handles the installation of many things you'd normally find in a Linux environment, but almost all of what it installs gets placed into /usr/local/, where you'd expect to see things in /usr if you're coming from Linux. Emerge (on Gentoo Linux) also allows you to patch the original source as part of the build process.

As a developer, you can suggest an installation path, but it's up to the end user whether they follow your suggestion. The end user may follow their operating system's recommendation instead of yours. Make your software run from whatever location it's installed, but have your installer put it some place that makes sense anyway.

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Thanks. For that Hight Lights GHOTI –  Wangolo Joel Aug 23 '12 at 6:41

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