Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array that looks like this

array(
    1 => array(
        'id'     => 1,
        'name'   => 'first',
        'parent' => null
    ),
    2 => array(
        'id'     => 2,
        'name'   => 'second',
        'parent' => null
    ),
    3 => array(
        'id'     => 3,
        'name'   => 'third',
        'parent' => 1
    ),
    4 => array(
        'id'     => 4,
        'name'   => 'fourth',
        'parent' => 3
    ),
    5 => array(
        'id'     => 5,
        'name'   => 'fifth',
        'parent' => 1
    ),        
);

But I want to move any "child" items to the "children" key under the array. So, I want to end up with

array(
    1 => array(
        'id'       => 1,
        'name'     => 'first',
        'parent'   => null,
        'children' => array(
            3 => array(
                'id'       => 3,
                'name'     => 'third',
                'parent'   => 1,
                'children' => array(
                    4 => array(
                        'id'       => 4,
                        'name'     => 'fourth',
                        'parent'   => 3,
                        'children' => array()
                    ),
                )
            ),
            5 => array(
                'id'       => 5,
                'name'     => 'fifth',
                'parent'   => 1,
                'children' => array()
            )
        )
    ),
    2 => array(
        'id'       => 2,
        'name'     => 'second',
        'parent'   => null,
        'children' => array()
    )
);

But to be honest I have absolutely no idea where to start.

I was thinking maybe looping over each item in the array and then building the new array as I go with $new_array[$current['parent']]['children'][$current['id']] = $current;

But I run into issues as soon as I hit a nested item.

I could build a function that takes the current array, and the entire array and recursively moves up the tree to find all the parents and therefore the entire path, but I run into issues again if one of the parents has not been created yet.

The only option I could think of is to build an array map of the different levels of parents and the loop over that recursively and grab all the elements that way, but that seems somewhat inefficient?

Can anyone suggest a solution?

share|improve this question
    
I've been struggling with this one for quite some time... One question : Is it possible that Elem 4 could come after Elem 3 in the initial array? (what I want to know is if there is any chance that children nodes could have to be created prior to their parent nodes) - and yep, when trees are involved, recursion is the first thing that comes to my mind... but we got to be careful with... details... ;-) (I haven't got it right yet) –  Dr.Kameleon Aug 21 '12 at 6:20
    
@Dr.Kameleon I believe my solution does what the OP wants in this case. It will only work in PHP 5 onward though, because References didn't quite exist in 4, as far as I'm told. –  ATaylor Aug 21 '12 at 6:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You had the right idea with the foreach loop. What you want to do, however, requires the 'magic' of references.

foreach($oldArray as $key => &$item) {
    if($item["parent"] == null) $newArray[$key] = &$item;
    else $oldArray[$item["parent"]]["children"][$key] = &$item;
}

unset($item);

This will output for '$oldArray'

Array
(
[1] => Array
    (
        [id] => 1
        [name] => first
        [parent] => 
        [children] => Array
            (
                [3] => Array
                    (
                        [id] => 3
                        [name] => third
                        [parent] => 1
                        [children] => Array
                            (
                                [4] => Array
                                    (
                                        [id] => 4
                                        [name] => fourth
                                        [parent] => 3
                                    )

                            )

                    )

                [5] => Array
                    (
                        [id] => 5
                        [name] => fifth
                        [parent] => 1
                    )

            )

    )

[2] => Array
    (
        [id] => 2
        [name] => second
        [parent] => 
    )

[3] => Array
    (
        [id] => 3
        [name] => third
        [parent] => 1
        [children] => Array
            (
                [4] => Array
                    (
                        [id] => 4
                        [name] => fourth
                        [parent] => 3
                    )

            )

    )

[4] => Array
    (
        [id] => 4
        [name] => fourth
        [parent] => 3
    )

[5] => Array
    (
        [id] => 5
        [name] => fifth
        [parent] => 1
    )

)

And for newArray (the 'purified' version)

Array
(
[1] => Array
    (
        [id] => 1
        [name] => first
        [parent] => 
        [children] => Array
            (
                [3] => Array
                    (
                        [id] => 3
                        [name] => third
                        [parent] => 1
                        [children] => Array
                            (
                                [4] => Array
                                    (
                                        [id] => 4
                                        [name] => fourth
                                        [parent] => 3
                                    )

                            )

                    )

                [5] => Array
                    (
                        [id] => 5
                        [name] => fifth
                        [parent] => 1
                    )

            )

    )

[2] => Array
    (
        [id] => 2
        [name] => second
        [parent] => 
    )

)

Now, why this works: By putting &item into the foreach loop, we work with a reference to the item, instead of a copy. That means, whatever we change about that item, we also change at the corresponding array element.

By passing &$item to $newArray[$key], or to the children array, we pass the reference along...so whatever we do to the 'original object' (i.e. [3]), we also do to all the references.

The unset($item) is necessary, because it erases the binding between the last instance of $item and the variable. Otherwise, we'd change the last variable as well, as soon as we change the $item variable once more. Not exactly necessary in this script, but still a good practice to remember.

share|improve this answer
    
But you then run into an issue when you get to the multiple levels, e.g. when you hit 4 you have already moved 3 into the children array of 1 so the 3 key no longer exists as you are trying to access it, you would need $item[1]['children'][3]['children'][4] make sense? –  Hailwood Aug 21 '12 at 5:51
    
@Hailwood Yeah, I know what you mean, I'm currently working out the correct solution. Hold on please :) –  ATaylor Aug 21 '12 at 5:57
    
@Hailwood Sorry for the long delay, it was a bit trickier than I had originally thought, yet simple. Take a look now, it should work this way. –  ATaylor Aug 21 '12 at 6:25
    
@ATaylor that's great, so I wont write my 25 lines of code here. I've gone too far too. damnthis, so simple :D –  F0G Aug 21 '12 at 6:42
1  
@ATaylor Well, it's one of those little coding challenges that 'tickle' our brain cells and make all of us proud to be called programmers. Honestly, I've played with this one for quite some time, and I must say that your approach could be one of the most smart and elegant I've seen. –  Dr.Kameleon Aug 21 '12 at 6:59

You could convert them from arrays into objects. This would be easy enough to do, you pretty much have an object strucutre there already.

The difference would be that you could set up a __construct() function within each object that is passed it's ID number as a param and inside the __construct() function you look through your master array for children and add them in. As it adds in a new child item, it again triggers the __construct() function in this child, which will again search through the array for it's own children.

You could well end up with a wonderful object with next to no work. If you wanted them as an array at the very end, you could have a function that returns the entire heirachy as an array - but wouldn't objects be better for you anyhow?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.