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I'm looking for a cross-platform (Windows, Linux, Mac) C++ 2D game engine with an actual object oriented approach, instead of just crappy singletons and such. I'm looking to create some small, physics-based, free and open source games, so the license must be either MIT/BSD or GPL.

I found many good options, but they were all in high level languages and the development seemed stalled. LibGosu, for example, seems great, but it lacks basic stuff like collision detection. LOVE, Cocos2D are great, but they're in Lua and Python, respectively. Is there any good C++ alternative that does not make my life a dependency hell and allows me to write proper OO code?

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why do you consider "actual object orientation" a good approach to making games? –  Nek Aug 23 '12 at 7:45

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Check out cocos2d-x, a c++ port of cocos2d-iphone. Combined with Box2D ( http://box2d.org/ ) for simple physics, it offers a lot of possibilities.

Both are c++, under MIT and zlib license respectively.

Edit: as of cocos2d-x v2, the linux port is no longer supported ( http://www.cocos2d-x.org/projects/cocos2d-x/wiki/Tutorials )

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Cocos2d-x has no Linux support, as far as i am aware. –  vinnylinux Aug 21 '12 at 7:58
    
I never tried it myself on Linux, but according to their wiki, it seems to be supported: cocos2d-x.org/projects/cocos2d-x/wiki –  arnoo Aug 21 '12 at 8:01
    
"But please note that linux port is only exist on cocos2d-x v1.x versions, we remove this port in v2.0". It sucks, sadly. :( –  vinnylinux Aug 21 '12 at 13:53
    
Ok then... It sucks indeed... –  arnoo Aug 21 '12 at 15:05

There is a tradeoff between having a prebuilt object model ready to go and rolling your own. While it may be faster to start with a prebuilt OM, it might not suit your needs later down the track, and will be a pain to modify (or more likely work around) to your needs. This is why a lot of engines expose their functionality at a slightly lower level then you might code your client against, requiring you to create the "glue" layer yourself.

As for finding an engine, you can just use a 3D engine with quads/sprites and an orthogonal projection on your camera (which is just constricted to move through a plane) to get the same effect as a 2D engine. You can basically fix the Z component of your 3D (say to 0) and you can treat it more or less like 2D. Plus you will likely get a more performant engine with the added benefit of being able to easily incorporate 3D features and concepts later down the line if you want to.

You will have a much wider variety and likelihood of finding what you need (from an API/OM sense) than if you restrict yourself to 2D engines.

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Did you look at ClanLib?

I used it to create a small 2D game myself. Linux and Windows are supported (Mac only partially, however) and it is C++. Also, it has many basic features and optional graphics card acceleration and such. The license is very liberal.

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Yes, i did, but quite unstable on Mac OSX and the code is terrible. –  vinnylinux Aug 21 '12 at 7:59

You can use SFML

It's easy to use, and there are many physics engine you can add to it.

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COCOS2D-x is OK for you, but it doesn't include collision detection, so you need to realize it by yourself or use third-party lib. I recommend Box2d

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Angel2d is an object orientated game engine for develop fast prototypes for games in the developmet phase. Since it is programmed in C++, later on you can use the code for the real development phase too.

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Try Oxygine game framework. It is based on top of SDL2

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