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I haven't found any complete cross-browser doc of this variable.

What is arguments.callee for? how does it work?

Which arguments does it have?

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Others noted what arguments.callee is (and pointed to the MDN, which has a good write up on the subject) - What you could use arguments.callee for is in a recursive function that calls itself. –  Jack Pattishall Aug 21 '12 at 7:41
    
That (along with all other things) is a poor use of callee. It would be much better and much less brittle to give the function a name and call it using that name. –  Mathias Schwarz Aug 21 '12 at 7:57
    
if by "which arguments does it have" you mean: which arguments does it expect, the answer is: which arguments does the function "expect" in which you're using arguments.callee, arguments.callee.length will tell you just that. weird nobody pointed this out: X-browser, sure; even IE8 supports it, But: BE CAREFUL WITH STRICT MODE it'll throw errors –  Elias Van Ootegem Aug 21 '12 at 8:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

arguments.callee is a reference to the function that is currently being called. First things first: don't use it: if you're in a strict context, it'll just spew errors.

However, personally -and I'm not alone in this- I'll miss this property. Before I get to explain why, I'll give you a pseudo-example of when you might use this:

var looper = (function(someClosureVar)
{
    setTimeout((function(resetTimeout)
    {
        return function()
        {
            //do stuff, stop OR:
            resetTimeout();
        };
    }(arguments.callee)),1000);
}(document.getElementById('foobar')));

I hope you like closures, because I do - and that's where arguments.callee are very likely to occur. The next-to-last line is where the money is:

(arguments.callee)

Is a reference to the anonymous function that sets the initial timeout, within a closure scope (that has access to 1 DOM element, in this case). Anonymous functions are GC'ed after they return, but in this case, I've added it to the timeout callback's scope (passed it as an argument to another anonymous function that returns the actual callback), so it is still referenced somewhere.
Now, if you're in strict you needn't worry because this is what the code would look like in strict mode:

var looper = (function tempName(someClosureVar)
{
    setTimeout((function(resetTimeout)
    {
        return function()
        {
            //do stuff, stop OR:
            resetTimeout();
        };
    }(tempName)),1000);
}(document.getElementById('foobar')));

Name the function and that's it. Why don't I like it? arguments.callee raises flags, just like anonymous functions that some closure trickery is going on. I guess it's just a habit, but its one that, I feel, helps me to structure and debug my code more easily.
Couple that with a pathological hatred for IE, which comes natural to anyone doing some client-side scripting. IE versions that don't support strict mode, tend to leak the function name to the global namespace, thus never allowing the memory associated with the function (and the closure we've created) to be GC'ed. Which might lead to circular references, and, worse still, circular DOM references, which can lead to memory-leaks.

Actually: here's another, real example of where arguments.callee is used: event delegation and detaching event listeners
here's some more info on JS strict mode and recursion using arguments.callee.

The last question has, IMO the most clear cut example of how arguments.callee is handy: recursive replacing functions:

function someF(foo)
{
    //'use strict'; <-- would throw errors here
    foo = foo.replace(/(a|b)+/gi, function (p1,p2)
    {
        if (p1.match(/(a|b){2,}/i))
        {
            return p1.replace(/(a|b)/gi,arguments.callee);//recursive
        }
        return (p2.match(/a/i) ? 'X':'Y');
    });
}

As requested arguments.callee on MDN, warns for usage in strict mode (ECMA 5, that explains why DC says arguments.callee is deprecated)
And more on strict

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1  
Do you mind to attach MDN doc links ? –  Jordi P.S. Aug 21 '12 at 10:39
    
@JordiP.S.: 2 links added to the bottom of my answer, both MDN –  Elias Van Ootegem Aug 21 '12 at 10:51
    
thanks, that makes the answer complete –  Jordi P.S. Aug 21 '12 at 11:50
    
Answer is missing a closing bracket at the end of the first code block after getElementById('foobar') –  Frug Dec 17 '13 at 21:49
1  
@Frug: Edited, and might I add: well spotted. I've also changed the IIFE's, moving the invoking parentheses inside the grouping operator –  Elias Van Ootegem Dec 18 '13 at 6:41

Calee is part of the ECMAScript 3 standard, so it should be safe for cross-browser use. Callee holds the function that is currently executing and invoking it will invoke the current function. Therefore callee takes exactly the same arguments as the enclosing function (or rather it is the current function). Some more information is available here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Functions_and_function_scope/arguments/callee

It is considered bad style to use callee. Give you function a name instead and use this name...

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callee is a property of the arguments object. It can be used to refer to the currently executing function inside the function body of that function.

MDN docs here

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It specifies the currently executing function, so arguments.callee is the current function. It may be helpfull if you need to go recursive in anonimous function. Here example from mozilla:

function create() {
   return function(n) {
      if (n <= 1)
         return 1;
      return n * arguments.callee(n - 1);
   };
}

var result = create()(5); // returns 120 (5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1)
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arguments.callee is a round about way of knowing the current executing function by asking 'Who is calling this specific argument?' . . . .

 function factorial(a){
    if(a>0)
      return a*arguments.callee(a-1);
 }

Here if you call factorial(5), it will check for condition greater than 0, and if it is true, will execute the same logic for the next lesser number . . . In some cases you don't know the name of the function to be called . . . .so you can use this property

here is a good reference

arguments.callee from MDN

UPDATE: arguments.callee() is deprecated in ES5

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