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I have a question related to C++ class member initialization. The following code illustrates my question:

class ABCD
{
public:
    ABCD():ObjNum(3){};
    ~ABCD() {};
     static const  unsigned char getByte[8];
     const int ObjNum;


};

const unsigned char ABCD::getByte[8] = {
    'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h'
};

int main() 
{
     ABCD test;
     cout<<test.getByte[3]<<endl;


     return 0;
}

The above codes work very well, but now if I do not set getByte[8] as static, how could I initialize the class? I have tried in this way, but failed:

class ABCD
{
public:
    ABCD():ObjNum(3),getByte('a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h')
    {

    };
    ~ABCD() {};
    const  unsigned char getByte[8];
     const int ObjNum;


};



int main() 
{
     ABCD test;
     cout<<test.getByte[3]<<endl;


     return 0;
}

The error I have obtained is as follows:

 error C2536: 'ABCD::ABCD::getByte' : cannot specify explicit initializer for arrays

I understand the reason why I got the error, but I do not know how to fix it. Any idea? Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
Do you really need a char array? It is better to use std::string. If you use C++11 you have also std::array that you can initialize with std::initializer_list. –  user1434698 Aug 21 '12 at 8:05
1  
What's wrong with the first code and why do you want to change it? –  SingerOfTheFall Aug 21 '12 at 8:05
1  
    
@SingerOfTheFall There is nothing wrong with the first code, and it is just out of curious. –  feelfree Aug 21 '12 at 8:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In C++11 you can initialize it like this:

ABCD() : ObjNum(3), getByte{'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h'} {}

If you are going to use C++11, though, it would be better to use std::array as others have suggested in the comments. You could then define the array like:

const std::array<unsigned char, 8> getByte;

and initialize it in this way (note the double braces):

ABCD() : ObjNum(3), getByte{{'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h'}} {}
share|improve this answer
1  
simultaneous? :) –  Grzegorz Herman Aug 21 '12 at 8:09
    
@GrzegorzHerman Indeed... the three of us just posted the same solution :) –  betabandido Aug 21 '12 at 8:10
1  
@GrzegorzHerman and if I wasn't so slow at typing there would be more... –  juanchopanza Aug 21 '12 at 8:17

In C++11 you can initialize arrays like this:

ABCD() : getByte { 'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h' }
{ ... }
share|improve this answer

It is better to abandon C arrays. In C++ it is better to use std::string. In this case:

class A
{
public:
   A() : s("abcdefgh") {}

private:
   std::string s;
}

In C++11 you can use std::array and use std::initializer_list

class A
public:
   A() : s{'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h'} {}

private:
   std::array<8> s;
}
share|improve this answer

In C++03 you can change the member to be of type boost::array and initialize it in the constructor with a function that returns boost::array<char,8>.

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If you have a C++11 compatible compiler, you should be able to use like this:

ABCD():ObjNum(3),getByte{'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h'}

But if your compiler can't handle that you have to initialize the array manually in the constructor, either element by element or by having another array and then do e.g. memcpy.

Edit: If your compiler cant handle the C++11 syntax, you're pretty much out of luck. However, GCC since at least version 4.4, and also VC++2010, do handle it. So unless you have requirements forcing you to use "ancient" compilers it shouldn't be a problem.

share|improve this answer
    
It is const though. –  juanchopanza Aug 21 '12 at 8:11

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