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Objective : Write a function OpenFile that accepts as input an ifstream by reference and prompts the user for the name of a file. If the file can be found, OpenFile should return with the ifstream opened to read that file. Otherwise, OpenFile should print an error message and reprompt the user. (Hint: If you try to open a nonexistent file with an ifstream, the stream goes into a fail state and you will need to use .clear() to restore it before trying again)

#include "stdafx.h"

#include<iomanip>
#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

ifstream& openfile(ifstream &filename)
{
    string s; 
    cout << "Enter the file name";
    cin >> s;

    filename.open( s.c_str() );
    if (!filename.is_open())
    {

    cout << "file not open";
    filename.clear();
    system("PAUSE");

    } else {
         return filename;
    }


}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    ifstream &fmain=openfile(fmain);
    return 0;
    system("PAUSE");
}

What I do understand is that one cannot explicitly return a stream from a function , but still I am unable to work out this question , even after struggling much .

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2  
-1 for awful formatting. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 21 '12 at 8:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have to instantiate a stream, then pass it to the function:

std::ifstream fmain;
openfile(fmain);

As for returning a reference, that would allow you to chain operations on the stream. But in your code example, it is not strictly necessary. Furthermore, it is not clear that the question asks you to return a reference to the ifstream. You could just return void when the stream is successfully opened, but returning ifstream& is fine:

ifstream& openfile(ifstream &filename)
{
   if (file not opened OK) {
     // prompt user
   } else {
     return filename;
   }
}
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Doesn't the streams get closed automatically once they go out of scope , so I do not guess that void return method would work –  raikrahul Aug 21 '12 at 9:09
    
Is there something wrong with ifstream fmain; fmain= openfile(fmain); // I am getting a horrible error –  raikrahul Aug 21 '12 at 9:15
    
@raikrahul there shouldn't be anything wrong with that. –  juanchopanza Aug 21 '12 at 9:40
    
@raikrahul but you don't even have to do that. –  juanchopanza Aug 21 '12 at 9:41

No ifstream object exists in the posted code, only uninitialized references to ifstreams. Accesing an uninitialized reference is undefined behaviour. You need to create an ifstream instance first.

You are correct that you cannot return a stream from a function, as they are non-copyable:

std::ifstream _cause_compiler_error(std::ifstream& a_in)
{
    return a_in;
}

(they might be movable in C+11 but I am unsure) but you can return a reference to a stream as long as that stream is not local to the function which returns it:

std::ifstream& _bad_function()
{
    std::ifstream in("myfile.txt");
    return in;
} // `in` will be destructed, leaving the caller with
  // a dangling reference.
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I do understand your point . (Streams objects got no copy constructors ). But I am unable to figure out "OpenFile should return with the ifstream opened to read that file" What does It mean ? –  raikrahul Aug 21 '12 at 8:41
    
It means that the function should only return when it successfully opens the file. –  hmjd Aug 21 '12 at 8:42
    
Yes That setup is easy . But I still do not know what is thing that should be returned ? –  raikrahul Aug 21 '12 at 8:44
1  
@raikrahul, I think "If the file can be found, OpenFile should return with the ifstream opened to read that file" means that if the file is found then it should be opened at the time we return from the function. It's not about some return value. –  Alexander Chertov Aug 21 '12 at 8:51
1  
@raikrahul, change fmain= openfile(fmain); to openfile(fmain); as the returned stream is superfluous (you would only use it for chaining as mentioned by juanchopanza). –  hmjd Aug 21 '12 at 9:33

You are doing a terrible thing:

ifstream &fmain=openfile(fmain);

You are initializing a reference with a call to a function with this reference as the 1st parameter. This will probably get you an access violation. You need to create a proper ifstream object before calling openfile().

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