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If I inherit from a base class and want to pass something from the constructor of the inherited class to the constructor of the base class, how do I do that?

For example,

If I inherit from the Exception class I want to do something like this:

class MyExceptionClass : Exception
{
     public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extraInfo)
     {
         //This is where it's all falling apart
         base(message);
     }
}

Basically what I want is to be able to pass the string message to the base Exception class

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8  
Its also worth noting you can chain constructors in your current class by substituting this for base. –  Quibblesome Aug 15 '08 at 13:30
6  
I have done this when moving from Java to C#, hahaha. –  Guillermo Gutiérrez Jun 23 '12 at 22:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 640 down vote accepted

Modify your constructor to the following so that it calls the base class constructor properly:

public class MyExceptionClass : Exception
{
    public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extrainfo) : base(message)
    {
        //other stuff here
    }
}

Note that a constructor is not something that you can call anytime within a method. That's the reason you're getting errors in your call in the constructor body.

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13  
I think you may have missed the point. The problem was about calling a base constructor midway through the overriden constructor. Perhaps the data-type of the base constructor is not the same or you want to do some data moulding before passing it down the chain. How would you accomplish such a feat? –  Marchy Feb 16 '09 at 21:03
95  
If you need to call the base constructor in the middle of the override, then extract it to an actual method on the base class that you can call explicitly. The assumption with base constructors is that they're absolutely necessary to safely create an object, so the base will be called first, always. –  Jon Limjap Feb 17 '09 at 10:46
18  
It is just a method you can call any time, IL-wise. C# just happens to put extra restrictions on top of this. –  romkyns Apr 17 '11 at 3:03
12  
@romkyns touche, but few of us are doing anything that involves IL rewriting, :p –  Jon Limjap Apr 19 '11 at 10:46
1  
@romkyns For a class, yes. For a struct, no. C# doesn't allow you to call a base constructor for structs to make sure they stay (sort of) sane, and for classes to keep things the same across the board. (Compare to C++, where the same thing is true, except the stored on stack or on heap choice is made in the calling code, rather than in the class code, and the same limitation is in place) –  Jasper Mar 22 at 19:18
public class MyExceptionClass : Exception
{
    public MyExceptionClass(string message,
      Exception innerException): base(message, innerException)
    {
        //other stuff here
    }
}

You can pass inner exception to one of the constructors.

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Note that you can use static methods within the call to the base constructor...

    class MyExceptionClass : Exception
    {
         public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extraInfo) : 
         base(ModifyMessage(message, extraInfo))
         {
         }

         private static string ModifyMessage(string message, string extraInfo)
         {
             Trace.WriteLine("message was " + message);
             return message.ToLowerInvariant() + Environment.NewLine + extraInfo;
         }
    }
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4  
fascinating but less readability. –  Ramiz Uddin May 26 '11 at 11:46
4  
after seeing this Ruby would say KEEP IT SIMPLE SILLY! –  Ramiz Uddin May 26 '11 at 11:48

If you need to call the base constructor but not right away because your new (derived) class needs to do some data manipulation, the best solution is to resort to factory method. What you need to do is to mark private your derived constructor, then make a static method in your class that will do all the necessary stuff and later call the constructor and return the object.

public class MyClass : BaseClass
{
    private MyClass(string someString) : base(someString)
    {
        //your code goes in here
    }

    public static MyClass FactoryMethod(string someString)
    {
        //whatever you want to do with your string before passing it in
        return new MyClass(someString);
    }
}
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It is true use the base (something) to call the base class constructor, but in case of overloading use the this keyword

public ClassName() : this(par1,par2)
{
// do not call the constructor it is called in the this.
// the base key- word is used to call a inherited constructor   
} 

// Hint used overload as often as needed do not write the same code 2 or more times
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3  
This won't compile and you're also not explaining very well what you're trying to say. –  svick Nov 11 '13 at 11:36
1  
I see what you are trying to explain, and you are right. If you have two constructors in one class, you can reference one from the other by using the "this" keyword similarly to how you use "base" when calling the inherited constructor. However, this isn't what the OP asked for so this isn't really the place to add this. –  BiggsTRC Dec 4 '13 at 14:35

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