Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I inherit from a base class and want to pass something from the constructor of the inherited class to the constructor of the base class, how do I do that?

For example,

If I inherit from the Exception class I want to do something like this:

class MyExceptionClass : Exception
{
     public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extraInfo)
     {
         //This is where it's all falling apart
         base(message);
     }
}

Basically what I want is to be able to pass the string message to the base Exception class.

share|improve this question
11  
Its also worth noting you can chain constructors in your current class by substituting this for base. – Quibblesome Aug 15 '08 at 13:30
up vote 881 down vote accepted

Modify your constructor to the following so that it calls the base class constructor properly:

public class MyExceptionClass : Exception
{
    public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extrainfo) : base(message)
    {
        //other stuff here
    }
}

Note that a constructor is not something that you can call anytime within a method. That's the reason you're getting errors in your call in the constructor body.

share|improve this answer
15  
I think you may have missed the point. The problem was about calling a base constructor midway through the overriden constructor. Perhaps the data-type of the base constructor is not the same or you want to do some data moulding before passing it down the chain. How would you accomplish such a feat? – Marchy Feb 16 '09 at 21:03
115  
If you need to call the base constructor in the middle of the override, then extract it to an actual method on the base class that you can call explicitly. The assumption with base constructors is that they're absolutely necessary to safely create an object, so the base will be called first, always. – Jon Limjap Feb 17 '09 at 10:46
21  
It is just a method you can call any time, IL-wise. C# just happens to put extra restrictions on top of this. – romkyns Apr 17 '11 at 3:03
1  
@romkyns For a class, yes. For a struct, no. C# doesn't allow you to call a base constructor for structs to make sure they stay (sort of) sane, and for classes to keep things the same across the board. (Compare to C++, where the same thing is true, except the stored on stack or on heap choice is made in the calling code, rather than in the class code, and the same limitation is in place) – Jasper Mar 22 '14 at 19:18
2  
It is not a good design if you need to call the base class constructor midway during your constructor. The idea of a constructor is that it does all the work needed to do its task. This has the effect that when your derived constructor starts, the base class is already fully initialized and the derived class is free to call any base class function. If your design is such that you want to do something half way your constructor, then apparently this is not initializing the base class ans thus should not be in the constructor of the base class but in a separate, possibly protected function – HaraldDutch Dec 16 '15 at 7:28

Note that you can use static methods within the call to the base constructor.

class MyExceptionClass : Exception
{
     public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extraInfo) : 
         base(ModifyMessage(message, extraInfo))
     {
     }

     private static string ModifyMessage(string message, string extraInfo)
     {
         Trace.WriteLine("message was " + message);
         return message.ToLowerInvariant() + Environment.NewLine + extraInfo;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The Exception class is so locked down that I do find myself doing this a couple times, but also note it's not something you should do if you can avoid it. – SMASH Mar 11 '15 at 19:02
    
Hi @ChrisS, can I use like ` : base("My default message.")`, how use like this? – Carlos May 15 '15 at 18:32
    
Sorry, C# newb here. Why do you you call Trace.WriteLine("message was " + message)? – kdbanman Jul 9 '15 at 22:08
2  
@kdbanman That just outputs a debug message. No relevant functional purpose. – Nick Whaley Aug 21 '15 at 13:52

If you need to call the base constructor but not right away because your new (derived) class needs to do some data manipulation, the best solution is to resort to factory method. What you need to do is to mark private your derived constructor, then make a static method in your class that will do all the necessary stuff and later call the constructor and return the object.

public class MyClass : BaseClass
{
    private MyClass(string someString) : base(someString)
    {
        //your code goes in here
    }

    public static MyClass FactoryMethod(string someString)
    {
        //whatever you want to do with your string before passing it in
        return new MyClass(someString);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
public class MyExceptionClass : Exception
{
    public MyExceptionClass(string message,
      Exception innerException): base(message, innerException)
    {
        //other stuff here
    }
}

You can pass inner exception to one of the constructors.

share|improve this answer

It is true use the base (something) to call the base class constructor, but in case of overloading use the this keyword

public ClassName() : this(par1,par2)
{
// do not call the constructor it is called in the this.
// the base key- word is used to call a inherited constructor   
} 

// Hint used overload as often as needed do not write the same code 2 or more times
share|improve this answer
2  
I see what you are trying to explain, and you are right. If you have two constructors in one class, you can reference one from the other by using the "this" keyword similarly to how you use "base" when calling the inherited constructor. However, this isn't what the OP asked for so this isn't really the place to add this. – BiggsTRC Dec 4 '13 at 14:35
class Exception
{
     public Exception(string message)
     {
         [...]
     }
}

class MyExceptionClass : Exception
{
     public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extraInfo)
     : base(message)
     {
         [...]
     }
}
share|improve this answer

From Framework Design Guidelines and FxCop rules.:

1. Custom Exception should have a name that ends with Exception

    class MyException : Exception

2. Exception should be public

    public class MyException : Exception

3. CA1032: Exception should implements standard constructors.

  • A public parameterless constructor.
  • A public constructor with one string argument.
  • A public constructor with one string and Exception (as it can wrap another Exception).
  • A serialization constructor protected if the type is not sealed and private if the type is sealed. Based on MSDN:

    [Serializable()]
    public class MyException : Exception
    {
      public MyException()
      {
         // Add any type-specific logic, and supply the default message.
      }
    
      public MyException(string message): base(message) 
      {
         // Add any type-specific logic.
      }
      public MyException(string message, Exception innerException): 
         base (message, innerException)
      {
         // Add any type-specific logic for inner exceptions.
      }
      protected MyException(SerializationInfo info, 
         StreamingContext context) : base(info, context)
      {
         // Implement type-specific serialization constructor logic.
      }
    }  
    

or

    [Serializable()]
    public sealed class MyException : Exception
    {
      public MyException()
      {
         // Add any type-specific logic, and supply the default message.
      }

      public MyException(string message): base(message) 
      {
         // Add any type-specific logic.
      }
      public MyException(string message, Exception innerException): 
         base (message, innerException)
      {
         // Add any type-specific logic for inner exceptions.
      }
      private MyException(SerializationInfo info, 
         StreamingContext context) : base(info, context)
      {
         // Implement type-specific serialization constructor logic.
      }
    }  
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.