Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

JSHint's inspections now built into PhpStorm informed me about JavaScript magic numbers and I realise it'll make for clearer code to avoid using them.

I tried this:

var constants = {
    millisecs: 1000,
    secs: 60
};

and also this:

var constants = function () {
    this.millisecs = 1000;
    this.getMillisecs = function () {
        return this.millisecs;
    };
};

JsHint complains about both.

Taking the solution from this answer though works fine:

var constants = (function() {
    var millisecs = 1000,
        defaultMsgsPerSecond = 60;
    this.getMillisecs = function() { return millisecs; };
    this.getDefaultMsgsPerSecond = function() { return defaultMsgsPerSecond; };
})();

Presumably because of the closure. Why is it that this is accepted, whereas the other two suggestions taken from another SO question are not?

Edit: Although not triggering an error, it doesn't actually work. It errors to say constants is undefined. JsFiddle.

To clarify - by "works" I mean "doesn't trigger a warning from JsHint"

share|improve this question
    
One problem clearly appearing with your first two code examples, but missing in the latter code example, is that the "constants" are not that constant - that is, can be changed later in the code (with constants.millisecs = 100;). –  penartur Aug 21 '12 at 9:28
    
@penartur that strikes me as being the answer - the working example immediately calls itself, making its properties private and thus only the two getters are exposed? –  bcmcfc Aug 21 '12 at 9:48
    
@Wouter-Huysentruit please could you explain your edit? –  bcmcfc Oct 30 '13 at 11:14
    
Oops, didn't see that it was part of the problem of you question. I reversed my edit and added an answer instead. –  Wouter Huysentruit Oct 30 '13 at 19:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

about your edit

I think you wanted to new the inline object:

var constants = new (function() {
    var millisecs = 1000,
        defaultMsgsPerSecond = 60;
    this.getMillisecs = function() { return millisecs; };
    this.getDefaultMsgsPerSecond = function() { return defaultMsgsPerSecond; };
})();

But JSHint will also complain about that: Weird construction. Is 'new' unnecessary?.

If you use it as a closure, then you need to actually return something. If you don't, constants will indeed contain undefined. An easy fix would be to return this, but that would be a bad solution because you're extending this which is an instance of an object you do not own.

So returning an inline object seems to be the solution here:

var constants = (function() {
    var millisecs = 1000,
        defaultMsgsPerSecond = 60;
    return {
        getMillisecs: function() { return millisecs; }
        getDefaultMsgsPerSecond: function() { return defaultMsgsPerSecond; }
    };
})();
share|improve this answer

In EcmaScript 6, you'll be able to just do:

const MILLISECS = 1000;
const DEFAULT_MSG_PER_SECOND = 60;

But until then, you can use EcmaScript 5's Object.freeze:

var constants = {
  millisecs: 1000,
  defaultMsgPerSecond: 60
};

var constants = Object.freeze(constants);

// Now constants is in fact... a constant!
constants.millisecs = 999;
constants.millisecs; // Still === 1000

And if it's your nature to be verbose, you can try Object.defineProperties:

var constants = {};

Object.defineProperties(constants, {
    'millisecs': {
        value: 1000,
        writable: false
     },
    'defaultMsgPerSecond': {
        value: 60,
        writable: false
     },
});

// Again, constants is in fact... a constant!
constants.millisecs = 999;
constants.millisecs; // Still === 1000
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.