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I am developing an application in which I have 3 threads. Let us call them a,b,c.

Now I have to develop something like this.

Initially b waits for a to complete its task, and c waits for b.

As soon as 'a' finishes its task it notifies 'b'. 'b' should wake up. Now 'a' goes to wait state. 'a' will wait until it gets an acknowledgement from 'c'.

Now b finishes its task and notifies 'c'. Now 'c' wakes up and 'b' goes to wait state.

Now c finishes the task and acknowledges to 'a'. Now 'c' goes to wait.

This is circular process and continues from a -> b , b -> c, c->a

In between this cycle all threads access queues for data transfer i.e. 'a' puts data in queue q1, 'b' fetches it and puts in another queue q2, 'c' fetches from q2 and process it and give back to 'a'

I am stuck while implementing this functionality. Any idea about how this can be done?

Thanks...

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4  
I would have one thread which calls a, then b then c in a loop. Threads are only useful for partially or fully independent tasks. Can you explain the need to have threads? Is this [homework]? –  Peter Lawrey Aug 21 '12 at 9:50
    
What did you try so far? –  ShiDoiSi Aug 21 '12 at 9:50
    
I tried it using wait and notify functions. –  NK- Aug 21 '12 at 9:52
5  
Without you showing the code, I doubt anyone is going to correct it. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 21 '12 at 10:03
2  
@NK- What is wrong is that you appear to be trying to use threads for a problem best solved by not using threads. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 21 '12 at 10:27

3 Answers 3

If you are allowed to use queues (it seems homework) then you can do something more elegant. Probably the resultant internal lockings are similar to solutions with semaphores, but more elegant.

Create 3 queues, one for each pair of processes. They don't send real data, just the signal to start.

Queue<Integer> queueA2B = new BlockingQueue<Integer>();
Queue<Integer> queueB2C = new BlockingQueue<Integer>();
Queue<Integer> queueC2A = new BlockingQueue<Integer>();

// initialize only the queue that *feeds* A:

queueC2A.put(1);

Each process must take an item from its queue, do its process and send a signal to the next. By example A:

while (...) {
   queueC2A.take(); // this will block until there's something in the queue
   // do my stuff
   queueA2B.put(1); // send "signal" to the next process
}
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Nice question, I have written a small class that will demonstrate how Semaphores can be used to run threads in a sequence. Hope this helps:

public class LockingDemo{

    private Semaphore a = new Semaphore(0);
    private Semaphore b = new Semaphore(0);
    private Semaphore c = new Semaphore(1);

    class A implements Runnable{
        @Override
        public void run() {
            try {
                c.acquire(1);
                System.out.println("Doing A");
                a.release(1);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
    class B implements Runnable{
        @Override
        public void run() {
            try{
                a.acquire(1);
                System.out.println("Doing B");
                b.release(1);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
    class C implements Runnable{
        @Override
        public void run() {
            try{
                b.acquire(1);
                System.out.println("Doing C");
                c.release(1);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }



    public void a() throws InterruptedException{
        new Thread(new A()).start();
    }

    public void b() throws InterruptedException{
        new Thread(new B()).start();
    }

    public void c() throws InterruptedException{
        new Thread(new C()).start();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        LockingDemo ld = new LockingDemo();
        System.out.println("FIRST RUN CALLING B -> A -> C");
        ld.b();
        ld.a();
        ld.c();
        Thread.currentThread().sleep(2000);
        System.out.println("SECOND RUN CALLING C -> B -> A");
        ld.c();
        ld.b();
        ld.a();
    }
}

Here is the OUTPUT

FIRST RUN CALLING B -> A -> C
Doing A
Doing B
Doing C
SECOND RUN CALLING C -> B -> A
Doing A
Doing B
Doing C
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I would do it with semaphores. The threads are requiring their own semaphore and when finished, release the next semaphore. You can of course also do this with monitors (Object#wait() and Object#notify()). To ensure them running in a circular fashion, you simply let them run in endless loops and waiting for the semaphores to be filled:

import java.util.concurrent.Semaphore;

public class Main {
    private Semaphore a = new Semaphore(1), b = new Semaphore(0), c = new Semaphore(0);

    public class A implements Runnable {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while (true) {
                try {
                    a.acquire(1);
                    Thread.sleep((long) (Math.random() * 1000));
                    System.out.println("performing task A");
                    b.release(1);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            }
        }
    }

    public class B implements Runnable {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while (true) {
                try {
                    b.acquire(1);
                    Thread.sleep((long) (Math.random() * 1000));
                    System.out.println("performing task B");
                    c.release(1);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            }
        }
    }

    public class C implements Runnable {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while (true) {
                try {
                    c.acquire(1);
                    Thread.sleep((long) (Math.random() * 1000));
                    System.out.println("performing task C");
                    a.release(1);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            }
        }
    }

    public void startThreads() {
        new Thread(new A()).start();
        new Thread(new B()).start();
        new Thread(new C()).start();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Main ld = new Main();
        ld.startThreads();
    }
}

The cool thing with this solution as opposed to monitors is that you can simply fill up a semaphore from the outside to start a second "thread-worm" to run in circles.

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