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Possible Duplicate:
How to call base.base.method()?

I have some trouble with Inheritance in C#. I've sketched three classes: A, B and C. C inherits from B and B from A. Now the B class calls base.Method1 and works fine but I can't call A.method1 from the C class. If I call base.Method1 from C obviously that method will be method1 of B. Any advice?

P.S. in A class there are some fields marked private so you can access them only

class A
{    
    private instance;    
    public virtual void Method1 ()
    {       
        instance = this;
        do something;       
    }
}

class B : A
{
    public override void Method1()
    {
        base.Method1();
        do something;       
    }
}

class C : B
{   
    public override void Method1 ()
    {
        //need A Method1 then do something
    }
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Rawling, Rich O'Kelly, CodesInChaos, Peter Ritchie, kprobst Aug 21 '12 at 19:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
why would you want to do that? If you describe your problem it will be easier to help you. – Tomas Jansson Aug 21 '12 at 10:01
2  
Well maybe then you should be more interested in C : A then ! – V4Vendetta Aug 21 '12 at 10:01
    
While .net allows this, C# does not. And it's a bad idea anyways. – CodesInChaos Aug 21 '12 at 10:05
    
A c = new C(); c.Method1(); this calls A.Method1() but when you say C c = new C(); c.Method1(); it calls C.Method1() – Mahdi Tahsildari Aug 21 '12 at 10:08
    
@Codes: A comment on an answer on the question I linked suggests that it's no longer possible to do this in .NET - do you know whether it is or not? (I'll readily admit I have no idea, I'm just curious.) – Rawling Aug 21 '12 at 10:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a feature of C#. If you wish to expose this method to class C, consider refactoring A like so:

class A
{    
  private instance;    
  public virtual void Method1 ()
  {
    AMethod1();       
  }

  protected void AMethod1()
  {
    instance = this;
    do something;       
  }
}

This will enable you to call this method from within C:

class C : B
{   
  public override void Method1 ()
  {
    AMethod1();
    // do something;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this was the fastest and simple solution :D – Pasquale Sada Aug 21 '12 at 10:19

You cannot skip directly to A using base.Method1, because that's just for the one above. However, you can use a protected delegate or reference to A to make a direct call. Make a protected field Action _A_Method1 and in the constructor of A, set it to Method1 (_A_Method1 = Method1). Now you can use a direct call to that from class C (_A_Method1();).

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You can enclose inline code between backticks `, so it gets formatted as code – CodesInChaos Aug 21 '12 at 10:07
    
That's clever, though clunky. – Jim Balter Apr 21 at 21:59

It is not possible to do this in C#, thought its possible to do this via IL.

For your case, you may do something like this:

class A
{
    private int instance;
    public virtual void Method1()
    {
        Method1Impl();
    }

    protected void Method1Impl()
    {
    }
}

Now you can call A.Method1Impl from your C class.

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