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I'd like to relicense my open source project under a non-viral GPL incompatible license.

Which license should I choose?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by bummi, talonmies, McDowell, Mihai Maruseac, Mena Sep 8 '13 at 12:42

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I can understand why some people might want a non-copyleft license, but why on Earth would you specifically want it to be GPL-incompatible? –  TRiG Feb 12 '10 at 18:21
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In the same way RMS has this thing against closed-source fascism, some people have this thing against RMS and the GPL's brand of fascism. The license infects whatever code it touches, and some people might want to keep the infection from spreading. –  cHao Jul 24 '11 at 19:10
    
Wouldn't any license that's GPL-incompatible have to have that incompatibility attached to it in a viral manner? –  Nate C-K Jul 20 '12 at 16:32
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No. The GPL is viral because it requires other code linked into the same address space also be under the GPL. Licenses are only compatible with GPL of they allow the viral relicensing under the GPL. An artistic license which allows binary distributions without source, and forbids adding additional restrictions to the source, is not viral. It can be linked with any non-viral code, and can be distributed in source form with code under different non-viral licenses. It's other viral licenses like the GPL which choose to be incompatible with it. –  David Jeske Sep 8 '13 at 2:12
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about licensing. –  McDowell Sep 8 '13 at 8:43
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10 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There is a full list on the GNU website.

http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/license-list.html#GPLIncompatibleLicenses

You could use MPL or MS-PL or the BSD license or Apache v1/1.1. Keep in mind that BSD and Apache licenses have revised versions (the ones commonly used) which are compatible with particular versions of the GPL.

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Just what I was looking for! Tnx man! –  oba Jul 30 '09 at 9:02
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Note: I personally use GPL in some of my open source project, I use lots of GPL software and have no religious beliefs that would stop me from using GPL software. Copyleft can be a pain in the behind sometimes. Nonetheless, keep in mind, that people writing GPL software are programmers just like you that are not trying to destroy the world. –  Sam Saffron Jul 30 '09 at 9:15
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@Sam Saffron, no one is saying that GPL software programmers are evil. If you write code, you can license it however you like. That said, it is absurd that the term "free" is applied to software licensed under the GPL, given the restrictiveness of that license. Using the GPL reduces the usefulness of the software and, as a result, may reduce the interest in collaborating on that software. IMHO, there is no reason to license one's own software under GPL if one can release it under LGPL. Of course, if one is using a GPL library, then one has no choice. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Jul 30 '09 at 23:17
    
@Michael, GPL is not the only viral license, creative commons have a few, MS have a MS-RL and so on. To choose a license that is, on purpose, non-compatible with the GPL (yet still compatible with other viral licenses) is a little odd. –  Sam Saffron Jul 30 '09 at 23:24
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@MichaelAaronSafyan: If you want to ensure that only software which respects the four freedoms of its users can (easily) profit from your work, then GPL is the license of choice. I use it to give free software an edge over unfree software: If something I did could reduce your cost when creating a new project, you can get an advantage over others by making your new project GPL-compatible. Which in turn can give me an advantage later on, when I find that I could benefit from some of your code. –  Arne Babenhauserheide Feb 8 '13 at 10:33
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The Simplified BSD License is, IMHO, the best way to go. The license is both simple and permissive:

Copyright (C) <year>, <copyright holder>
All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

    * Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
      notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

    * Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
      notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
      documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY <copyright holder> ''AS IS'' AND ANY
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL <copyright holder> BE LIABLE FOR ANY
DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
(INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES;
LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND
ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
(INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS
SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

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But this license is compatible with the GPL. –  lutz Jul 30 '09 at 16:19
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Yes. But the reason why GPL is obnoxious is because it makes the software virtually unusable (unless all the work you are doing is for free). You don't want to be obnoxious, too, do you? –  Michael Aaron Safyan Jul 30 '09 at 21:07
    
-1 not answering the question (GPL-incompatibility) without saying that! That makes impression it's GPL incompatible, even though it is not. –  peenut Jul 20 '12 at 15:50
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Have you considered the WTFPL?

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hah, I beat you to it :p –  jalf Jul 30 '09 at 8:46
    
Hahahaha nice :) +1 –  the_drow Jul 30 '09 at 8:57
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You want a non-viral GPL incompatible open source license? DJB FTW.

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Note that djb has placed some (most?), but not all of his software into the public domain. –  Mark Johnson Aug 4 '09 at 18:02
    
+1 very interesting reading, thanks for link! In short: it's no-license approach :-) –  peenut Jul 20 '12 at 16:19
    
My impression is that while he calls it a no-license approach, in fact he does license the software freely, it's just that instead of putting the licensing terms into a "license" document, he puts them into some documents on his website instead. –  Nate C-K Jul 20 '12 at 16:36
    
For any software that has not been placed in the public domain, the copyright holder does have to explicitly give permission to copy it, otherwise by the default only the copyright holder has that right. Whether you call the statement giving the right a "license" or not seems to be a trivial effort to obscure the issue. –  Nate C-K Jul 20 '12 at 16:41
    
@NateC-K You don't just need permission to copy, you need permission to create a derivative work (a fork, say). Without both, I would argue that it's not free (as in freedom or as in beer) software. It's called license free software because the tarballs shipped with nothing but a copyright statement. That's not an attempt to obscure anything –  Mark Johnson Apr 23 '13 at 20:49
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It's very simple to "create" the anti-gpl license like https://gist.github.com/12896 or https://gist.github.com/12906

Basically, you write something like:

  • "No part of software may be included in software projects that are solely distributed under strong copyleft restricted licenses."
  • append BSD/ISC/MIT license here, your choice

It is not good idea to use currently-incompatible licenses (old Apache, old 4-clause BSD license), because they might become GPL-compatible with newer GPL license (e.g. GPLv3 is compatible with more licenses). If you use anti-copyleft sentence in your license (as above), it will never be GPL-compatible, because copyleft is core of GPL.

Note that my suggestion is not just about GPL, it is incompatible with any viral (copyleft) license. GPL is just the notorious example of such restrictive license.

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Thank you for actually answering the question. You're the only one who did, and despite that, you had zero votes when I came to the page. –  Bill Warren Mar 20 '13 at 17:25
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You'd need to define "best" for this question to make any sense.

You might want to look at the OSI "licence by category" page to get an overview of the options though.

A search for "choosing an open source license" yields a number of articles, including this one which looks like a good starting point (although I notice it doesn't mention the Apache License, which is one of my preferred options). As has been pointed out in comments, the Apache v2 license is compatible with the GPL v3 license, so if you're really going for GPL incompatibility, that may not be a good fit for you.

Choosing an explicit license to be incompatible with is a pretty odd major criterion though...

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The Apache license is not compatible with GPLv2, but it is compatible with GPLv3 (one of the targets of GPLv3 was to gain compatibility with the Apache license). –  Pablo Jul 30 '09 at 8:51
    
Jon, this is good info, but it is not answering the question, Apache V2 is compatible with GPL v3, Apache 1.1 and 1.0 are not. –  Sam Saffron Jul 30 '09 at 8:53
    
I'll edit the answer to explain that part. Hopefully the OP actually has more interesting and positive criteria than "GPL incompatible"... –  Jon Skeet Jul 30 '09 at 8:59
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From the question, I gathered that he HATES evil GPL, and does not want anything to do with it, he does not want to help out with GPL open source projects. I think that position is flawed on many levels and completely against the spirit of open source. But to each his own. –  Sam Saffron Jul 30 '09 at 9:03
    
Everyone is free to HATE anything. stackoverflow is about helping to achieve whatever you want to, using programming, not about judging goals :-P –  peenut Jul 20 '12 at 15:56
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Erm, that would just make you an anti-GPL zealot. Do you really really want to paint yourself that way?

Ignore them, and pick a license what suits your ideology.

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Best at what?

A few I like are:

But it depends on what you want the license to actually do. Under which conditions should people be allowed to use or redistribute your product?

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These are all compatible, the question about incompatible ones. –  Cornelius Scarabeus Nov 30 '11 at 14:42
    
-1 These are all compatible, the question is about incompatible ones. You do not mention that licenses you mention, are in fact compatible. –  peenut Jul 20 '12 at 15:55
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Aferro GPL? Ryzom is using that for the core of of their game engine, their project was released as GPL by the game company. Mozilla works best if you want it viral, it does have the option to be compatible, but by default, without an explicit specification in the beginning, it is not. BSD works best otherwise, old BSD, not new. As an aside, you can pick the MIT or any other license and simply say "This code may not be covered by the GPL license."

Use the 4-clause original BSD license.

From some points of view, the GPL might not be what he considers open source. In fact, contributers to GPL-ed derivative projects CANNOT give back to his project under the same terms he gave his work unless his license is GPL incompatible and downstream projects either get a floss exception or don't use it. Considering the wars and witch-hunts that have occurred over people misinterpreting the GPL, it makes sense. I try to help people to understand the GPL. I have led people away from it, I have led people to it, and I have led people to the realization that they have no choice becuase they're already using GPL-ed code.

Anyone who loves 'free' software should relish the freedom of another piece of code... even if it can't be under the GPL, because it's still free... and not proprietary... just not 'free with strings'. It can be used in open source apps, built upon, and even distributed as a game with open source operating systems. It's still open source.

BSD is beautiful. It started as a closed source project... people patched it and patched it and patched it and then one day they looked up... and there was nothing left of the chains that held it down... it was free!

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One solution is to craft a slightly modified form of the BSD license...

Remain Truly Free License (RTFL)
Copyright (C) <year>, <copyright holder>
All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

    1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
       notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. 

    2. Redistributions in binary form are not restricted in any way.

    3. No additional restrictions may be added to this source code which would
       place limits on the terms of binary distributions. 


THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ''AS IS''. ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND 
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL ANY AUTHOR AND/OR
COPYRIGHT HOLDER BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE 
GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
(INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS
SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

Clauses 2/3 are GPL incompatible, since the GPL requires the entire work to be licensed under the GPL, and the GPL adds additional restrictions on binary forms which violate #2.

This license is not viral, because it does not require anything of any other licenses, or of the binary form. For example, this license and LGPL are compatible, since neither license is viral.

A better way to think about virility is that any viral license which violates #2 declares this license incompatible with it's virility.

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Unfortunately, i see a huge binary-shaped loophole in this license that could make it unenforceable. Let's say Alice distributes a "debug" binary under WTFPL. Bob decompiles Alice's binary, effectively netting him the source code minus any annoying legalese. Bob incorporates the decompilation results in his code, and releases the resulting work under GPL. At what point is either Alice or Bob infringing? And how would you prove that isn't exactly what happened? –  cHao Jan 8 at 19:00
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