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I renamed one main(int argc, char *argv[]) function to a normal sub function like a(int argc, char *argv[]); and call a() function in my main(). And then, I pass the arguments. for example.

char *arg[10];

arg[0]="program_name";
arg[1]="-a";
arg[2]="1";
arg[3]="-b";
arg[4]="2";

a (5, arg);

but a() returns fail. a() stops parsing at arg[1] position. I spend three days with this problem. Any Idea ?

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2  
First of all, you should terminate the array with a NULL pointer. Secondly, you should probably show how the function a parses parameters. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 21 '12 at 10:32
    
Can you post full code? Plus compiler output. –  hmjd Aug 21 '12 at 10:32
1  
It also may help to do arg[1] = strdup("-a"); and so on for the others. The function may not be expecting pointers to constants. –  David Schwartz Aug 21 '12 at 10:35
    
If a() attempts to modify any of those arguments it will most likely cause a seg fault as string literals are read-only. –  hmjd Aug 21 '12 at 10:36
    
Obviously something goes wrong in a, so how'd you expect anybody to help you without having information about a? –  bitmask Aug 21 '12 at 10:54

3 Answers 3

This program works :

void a(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    printf("%d\n", argc);
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < argc; ++i) {
            printf("%s\n", argv[i]);
    }
}

main( ) {
    char *arg[10];

    arg[0]="program_name";
    arg[1]="-a";
    arg[2]="1";
    arg[3]="-b";
    arg[4]="2";

    a(5, arg);
}

The output is :

5
program_name
-a
1
-b
2
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2  
"My car won't start when I put the key in it and turn, what should I do?" "Well, I tried that same procedure on my car, and it starts fine." Doesn't help him much, does it? –  David Schwartz Aug 21 '12 at 10:38
2  
@David: depends whether he notices some difference between his code and that in this answer. If so, then it might well be helpful for him to compare his non-working code against this working code. At the very least, this answer stands as an example of how to describe what you've done, which might help the questioner ask a better question. –  Steve Jessop Aug 21 '12 at 10:39
1  
Calling printf without a prototype in scope is Undefined Behaviour. I suggest you #include <stdio.h>. –  pmg Aug 21 '12 at 10:47

Your code gives the called function pointers to constants, which is not what it's expecting. You can use strdup to generate modifiable versions of the strings you want to pass it. It's not unusual for parsers to destructively-modify data that is only expected to be used once. This won't work if the data is constant.

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I recommend to use the debugger and step into the a(...) function to see exactly what's happening.

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