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I started a project using Entity Framework 4.3 Code First with manual migrations and SQL Express 2008 and recently updated to EF5 (in VS 2010) and noticed that now when I change something like a foreign key constraint, the migrations code adds the "dbo." to the start of the table name and hence the foreign key name it constructs is incorrect for existing constraints (and in general now seem oddly named).

Original migration script in EF 4.3 (note ForeignKey("Products", t => t.Product_Id)):

    CreateTable(
        "Products",
        c => new
            {
                Id = c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true),
                ProductName = c.String(),
            })
        .PrimaryKey(t => t.Id);

    CreateTable(
        "KitComponents",
        c => new
            {
                Id = c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true),
                Component_Id = c.Int(),
                Product_Id = c.Int(),
            })
        .PrimaryKey(t => t.Id)
        .ForeignKey("Products", t => t.Component_Id)
        .ForeignKey("Products", t => t.Product_Id)
        .Index(t => t.Component_Id)
        .Index(t => t.Product_Id);

Foreign Key names generated: FK_KitComponents_Products_Product_Id FK_KitComponents_Products_Component_Id

If I then upgrade to EF5 and change the foreign key the migration code looks something like (note the "dbo.KitComponents" and "dbo.Products" as opposed to just "KitComponents" and "Products"):

DropForeignKey("dbo.KitComponents", "Product_Id", "dbo.Products");
DropIndex("dbo.KitComponents", new[] { "Product_Id" });

and the update-database fails with the message: 'FK_dbo.KitComponents_dbo.Products_Product_Id' is not a constraint. Could not drop constraint. See previous errors.

so it seems as of EF5 the constraint naming has changed from FK_KitComponents_Products_Product_Id to FK_dbo.KitComponents_dbo.Products_Product_Id (with dbo. prefix)

How can I get EF5 to behave as it was in EF 4.3 so I don't have to alter every piece of new migration code it spits out?

I haven't been able to find any release notes about why this changed and what to do about it :(

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In EF5, we stopped stripping dbo off because if your user's default schema was not "dbo" things would break. Now we treat dbo just like any other schema. –  bricelam Aug 21 '12 at 18:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You can customize the generated code by sub-classing the CSharpMigrationCodeGenerator class:

class MyCodeGenerator : CSharpMigrationCodeGenerator
{
    protected override void Generate(
        DropIndexOperation dropIndexOperation, IndentedTextWriter writer)
    {
        dropIndexOperation.Table = StripDbo(dropIndexOperation.Table);

        base.Generate(dropIndexOperation, writer);
    }

    // TODO: Override other Generate overloads that involve table names

    private string StripDbo(string table)
    {
        if (table.StartsWith("dbo."))
        {
            return table.SubString(4);
        }

        return table;
    }
}

Then set it in your migrations configuration class:

class Configuration : DbMigrationsConfiguration<MyContext>
{
    public Configuration()
    {
        CodeGenerator = new MyCodeGenerator();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks @Brice, this was what I was looking for. I understand the change, but thought EF5 might deal with existing setups a little more elegantly...or at least give a warning. For others reading and wanting EF4 behavior you'll have to override most of the other Generate() functions to strip the dbo. and tweak the StripDbo() function to return a string - as a ref param doesn't work on properties. –  mips Aug 22 '12 at 1:53
1  
That's pretty neat that you can do that now. –  Bob. Aug 22 '12 at 16:24
    
@mips, I've updated the code accordingly; I was hoping I could change the ref parameter before you read it. ;) –  bricelam Aug 22 '12 at 16:25
    
I am getting the error Error 1 'NiDS.Web.Migrations.MigrationsGenerator.Generate(System.Data.Entity.Mig‌​rations.Model.DropIndexOperation, System.CodeDom.Compiler.IndentedTextWriter)': no suitable method found to override c:\users\wayne blackmon\documents\visual studio 2012\Projects\NiDS 2.0\NiDS.Web\Migrations\MigrationsGenerator.cs 9 33 NiDS.Web –  wayne.blackmon Oct 28 '12 at 20:46
    
Wayne, try changing IndentedTextWriter to System.Data.Entity.Migrations.Utilities.IndentedTextWriter? –  Patrick McDonald Nov 7 '12 at 14:56

This is a fine answer, however, if you're just looking for a 'quick fix' approach, there's this as well EF Migrations DropForeignKey fails when key is in a base class

Use the DropForeignKey overload which contains the parameters principalName and name -- which in this case means constraint name!

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For Automatic Migrations use this code:

public class MyOwnMySqlMigrationSqlGenerator : MySqlMigrationSqlGenerator
{
    protected override MigrationStatement Generate(AddForeignKeyOperation addForeignKeyOperation)
    {
        addForeignKeyOperation.PrincipalTable = addForeignKeyOperation.PrincipalTable.Replace("dbo.", "");
        addForeignKeyOperation.DependentTable = addForeignKeyOperation.DependentTable.Replace("dbo.", "");
        MigrationStatement ms = base.Generate(addForeignKeyOperation);
        return ms;
    }
}

And Set it on configuration:

SetSqlGenerator("MySql.Data.MySqlClient", new MyOwnMySqlMigrationSqlGenerator());
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