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Im trying to change the sort method in the following code to sort objects of any type rather than just string but a bit stumped, all advice welcome.

class SortNames {

static void sort(String[] s) {
    for (int i = 0; i<s.length; i++) {
        for (int j = i+1; j < s.length; j++) {
            if (s[i].compareTo(s[j])>0) {
                String t;
                t = s[i]; s[i] = s[j]; s[j] = t;
            }
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String[] names = {"Pete","Jill","May","Anne","Tim"};             
    sort(names);
    for (int i=0; i<names.length; i++) 
        System.out.println(names[i]);
}
}
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2  
1. You should at least reduce the scope to objects that are comparable. 2. What have you tried that does not work? There is not much to change. –  assylias Aug 21 '12 at 11:55
5  
I'm not clear. You say any type and yet you're passing and doing only String operations. Also, unless this is some sort of exercise, I would use Collections.sort. –  adarshr Aug 21 '12 at 11:56
    
only string sorting? make some clear ... @Dave –  Sanjaya Pandey Aug 21 '12 at 11:58
    
try string to ASCII conversion –  Sanjaya Pandey Aug 21 '12 at 12:00
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Turn SortNames into SortNames<T extends Comparable<? super T>>, and change String[] to T[], which is how Collections.sort() work:

public class SortNames<T extends Comparable<? super T>> {
    public void sort(T[] s) {
        for (int i = 0; i<s.length; i++) {
            for (int j = i+1; j < s.length; j++) {
                if (s[i].compareTo(s[j])>0) {
                    T t = s[i]; s[i] = s[j]; s[j] = t;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    // or static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> void, for static methods
}
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Hum.... You really want to compare strings with integers?? –  assylias Aug 21 '12 at 11:58
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If you want to sort arrays, you can use Arrays.sort(yourArray);.

If you really want to reimplement it using your algo (assuming it works), you only need to change a few things:

static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> void sort(T[] s) {
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length; i++) {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < s.length; j++) {
            if (s[i].compareTo(s[j]) > 0) {
                T t;
                t = s[i];
                s[i] = s[j];
                s[j] = t;
            }
        }
    }
}
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You are accepting String[] to sort method it will never be generic then.

 static void sort(String[] s)

Do you see any advantage over sort method of Collections.

public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> void sort(List<T> list) {
    Object[] a = list.toArray();
    Arrays.sort(a);
    ListIterator<T> i = list.listIterator();
    for (int j=0; j<a.length; j++) {
        i.next();
        i.set((T)a[j]);
    }
  }
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class City {
   public static void main (String args[])
   { 
     int i,j;
     String temp;
     String s[] = new String[6];
     for(i=0; i<6; i++)
       s[i]=args[i];
     for(i=0;i<6;i++) {
       for(j=0;j<6-i-1;j++) {
         if(s[j].compareTo(s[j+1])>0)
         {
           temp=s[j];
           s[j]=s[j+1];
           s[j+1]=temp;
         } 
       }
     }
     for(i=0; i<6; i++) {
       System.out.println(s[i]);
     }
   }
}   

This concept can be used is sorting any 6 string (number of string can be increased by programmer )

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You just need to implement the comparable interface to the object that you need to sort and make a little bit change to above code to make this code usable for any other objects.

class SortNames {

static void sort(Comparable[] s) {
    for (int i = 0; i<s.length; i++) {
        for (int j = i+1; j < s.length; j++) {
            if (s[i].compareTo(s[j])>0) {
                Comparable t;
                t = s[i]; s[i] = s[j]; s[j] = t;
            }
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String[] names = {"Pete","Jill","May","Anne","Tim"};             
    sort(names);
    for (int i=0; i<names.length; i++) 
        System.out.println(names[i]);
}
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Does not compile. –  assylias Aug 21 '12 at 11:59
    
sorry. there should be Comparable[] inplace of object[]. corrected. –  Kusum Adhikari Aug 21 '12 at 12:02
2  
Does not compile either... –  Baz Aug 21 '12 at 12:03
    
sorry. there should be Comparable[] inplace of object[]. corrected. String t; there is the problem. change it to Comparable t. You should know the problem. I didn't looked much at your code. I just go the sorting process. –  Kusum Adhikari Aug 21 '12 at 12:09
    
change String t to comparable. –  Kusum Adhikari Aug 21 '12 at 12:13
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