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I have a system where files are going to be copied over from one network share to another network share. The files are themselves not very big, but the number of files that are going to be copied over are in terms of 20000. The .NET service application which initiates the copy operation is going to be running in multiple machines but the source and destination folders are the same. This process appears to be unacceptably slow:

We are assuming this is because of high network I/O and Disk I/O.

What should be the troubleshooting steps to isolate the bottleneck? What solutions can be there in terms of the software design or hardware capacity in order to speed up the process.

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closed as off topic by Gabe, Peter Ritchie, Jack, Jim Garrison, Fluffeh Aug 22 '12 at 10:32

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dealing with lots of small files is always slower than dealing with the same amount of data in one large file because of all the additional dealing with the allocation tables, checking filename reference etc. It's even worse when you add in network latency to the requests. Not always useful but even on a gigabit LAN using windows file sharing zipping the files (zip without compression to make that fast) and extracting again on destination is probably going to be much faster –  Ben Stephens Aug 21 '12 at 12:10
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How fast is the network? 100Mbit? 1Gbit? What are the operating systems of your machines? Win7 brought improvements to the SMB2 protocol over Vista's version of it. XP uses SMB1 -- can be quite slow. –  hometoast Aug 21 '12 at 12:12
    
Is this a programming question? I don't see any code. –  Gabe Aug 21 '12 at 12:30
    
@Ben Zipping might be an excellent thought. Can you explain a bit more about the allocation tables and Checking file name reference. I need this information as I need to convince my manager to accept the approach.Also can you explain the zip without compression part. To me zipping and compression is a synonymous activity. Sorry for the naive questions. I am not from a CS background. –  koder Aug 21 '12 at 12:43
    
Zipping is a form of archiving but the most common on windows I'd like to clarify. When you're creating your archive in whatever software you should have the option to specify a compression level where 0 is not compressed. So this way it just copies everything into one package without spending cpu time trying to compress it. –  Ben Stephens Aug 21 '12 at 12:46
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Dealing with lots of small files is always slower than dealing with the same amount of data in one large file because of all the additional dealing with the allocation tables, checking filename reference etc. It's even worse when you add in network latency to the requests.

Not always going useful but even on a gigabit LAN using windows file sharing zipping the files (zip without compression to make that fast) and extracting again on destination is probably going to be much faster

Hometoasts answer is good though, I voted that one up because it covers off possibility of disk and network IO bottlenecks. I've really only provided a workaround rather than an answer.

Happy I've been able to help with something practical and easy to do though. :)

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First, determine if it's the disk or network. Start with the disks where you're writing. I write a quick app to spin up a few threads and write random data to a few different files of a fixed size. Measure how long it takes. Measure writing 1 large file, many small ones. If it is the disk, then it is most likely due to many separate write operations and a slow RPM drive. Or could be you are writing to a poorly configured disk array.

Second, check your network. Are your routers poor or over worked? Make SURE all of your machines and your routers agree on the speed and negotiation. 100Mbit-FullDuplex on the router and 100Mbit-AutoNegotiate on the server are not the same thing. (This was the case for us and helped tremendously)

As Ben commented, zipping the file and transferring one large file will help. I had this issue and I actually TAR'd the file. It was evven faster than zipping with no compression. I used SharpZipLib for both zip and tar.

You could also try buffering your reads and writes in separate threads. System.File.Copy, for us, wasn't even reliable over the network. Manually buffering our file transfers, showed some improvement but not enough to justify the complexity.

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