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I have a function:

sub ascii_to_hex ($)
{
    ## Convert each ASCII character to a two-digit hex number.
    (my $str = shift) =~ s/(.|\n)/sprintf("%02lx", ord .$1)/eg;
    return $str;
}

I need to add a '%' before each number. To receive %68%75%44

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1  
You almost certainly don't want that function prototype. –  Dave Cross Aug 21 '12 at 13:13
1  
Is it a typo that you wrote ord . $1 (note the period inbetween) as your sprintf argument? Because that will use $_ for ord, and then try to concatenate it with $1. –  TLP Aug 21 '12 at 16:32
    
s/(.|\n)// would be better as s/.//s –  ikegami Nov 16 '12 at 1:38

4 Answers 4

Simply escape the % by doubling it.

( my $str = shift ) =~ s/(.)/ sprintf "%%%02x", ord $1 /seg;
return $str;

But this is surely a bit faster:

( my $str = unpack 'H*', shift ) =~ s/(..)/%$1/sg;
return $str;

By the way, since 5.14, you can do

return unpack('H*', shift) =~ s/(..)/%$1/sgr;
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CPAN solution:

use URI::Escape;
sub ascii_to_hex { return uri_escape(shift, "\x00-\xFF"); }

Or

use URI::Escape qw(%escapes);
sub ascii_to_hex {
    (my $str = shift) =~ s/[\s\S]/$escapes{$1}/g;
    return $str;
}

URI::Escape is part of the URI package, which while not Core, it is required by many other modules and does tend to be installed on most systems.

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%% is used in sprintf format string to print a percent sign.

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+1 -- s/(.|\n)/sprintf("%%%02lx", ord .$1)/eg –  slim Aug 21 '12 at 12:56
    
good explanation about sprintf here –  gaussblurinc Aug 21 '12 at 14:36
sub ascii_to_hex ($)
{
  return join("", map { '%'.sprintf("%02x", ord($_)) } split(//, shift));
}
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1  
Thanks. It works –  user1614240 Aug 21 '12 at 12:52

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