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So I'm trying to see if there's some sneaky series of bit operations that will allow me to count how many bits in a uint32 are 1 (or rather the count mod 2).

The "obvious" way would be something like this:

uint32 count_1_bits_mod_2(uint32 word) {
    uint32 i, sum_mod_2;
    for(i = 0; i < 32; i++)
        sum_mod_2 ^= word;
        word >>= 1;

Is there some "sneaky" way to get the proper sum_mod_2 without using a loop?

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7 Answers 7

The fastest way to count bits is by using "magic numbers":

unsigned int v = 0xCF31; // some number
v = v - ((v >> 1) & 0x55555555);                    // reuse input as temporary
v = (v & 0x33333333) + ((v >> 2) & 0x33333333);     // temp
unsigned int c = ((v + (v >> 4) & 0xF0F0F0F) * 0x1010101) >> 24; // count

This prints 9 (link to ideone).

This takes 12 operations for 32-bit numbers - the same number a lookup-based method takes, but you do not need a lookup table.

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That's a neat link. There's a whole section there devoted to this very problem, with even faster methods. The following method computes the parity of the 32-bit value in only 8 operations using a multiply. The method above takes around 9 operations, and works for 32-bit words. –  Dubslow Aug 21 '12 at 12:45
    
@Dubslow I see - I didn't realize that you needed only a parity, not the bit count. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 21 '12 at 12:48
    
That's not the fastest. The fastest one is using lookup table, especially if you create one that uses 65536 (4 byte) key. Then it's nearly twice as fast as the magic numbers method. –  Hubert Kario Aug 21 '12 at 13:15
1  
@Hubert Kario: have you actually ever measured it? memory lookups are a lot more costly than bit operations... –  Karoly Horvath Aug 21 '12 at 13:17
    
@HubertKario The classic lookup method uses 256 numbers. 65536 is two bytes, not four. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 21 '12 at 13:19

The "best" way might depend upon what CPU architecture your code is running on. For example, Intel/AMD CPUs starting with Nehalem/Barcelona support a "popcnt" instruction which computes the number of 1 bits in an integer register, so in as few as two instructions (popcnt and bitwise AND with 1) you could compute the value you seek.

If you happen to be using a fairly recent version of GCC (or another compiler with similar support), you can use its __builtin_popcount() function to compute the population count, which with the "-mpopcount" or "-msse4.2" compilation flag specified uses the popcnt instruction. See this link for more information. E.g.:

uint32_t parity = __builtin_popcount(x) & 1;
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__popcnt16(), __popcnt(), and __popcnt64() are the equivalents under MSVC. –  Lance Richardson Aug 21 '12 at 16:57

The fastest fastest is using CPU popcnt instruction, close second is SSSE3 code. Fastest portable is bitslice method, followed by lookup table: http://www.dalkescientific.com/writings/diary/archive/2011/11/02/faster_popcount_update.html

As with everything, you should benchmark your load. Then optimise if it's too slow.

For AMD Phenom II X2 550, with gcc 4.7.1 (using g++ -O3 popcnt.cpp -o popcnt -mpopcnt -msse2):

Bitslice(7)            1462142 us; cnt = 32500610
Bitslice(24)           1221985 us; cnt = 32500610
Lauradoux              2347749 us; cnt = 32500610
SSE2 8-bit              790898 us; cnt = 32500610
SSE2 16-bit             825568 us; cnt = 32500610
SSE2 32-bit             864665 us; cnt = 32500610
16-bit LUT             1236739 us; cnt = 32500610
8-bit LUT              1951629 us; cnt = 32500610
gcc popcount            803173 us; cnt = 32500610
gcc popcountll         7678479 us; cnt = 32500610
FreeBSD version 1      2802681 us; cnt = 32500610
FreeBSD version 2      2167031 us; cnt = 32500610
Wikipedia #2           4927947 us; cnt = 32500610
Wikipedia #3           4212143 us; cnt = 32500610
HAKMEM 169/X11         3559245 us; cnt = 32500610
naive                 16182699 us; cnt = 32500610
Wegner/Kernigan       12115119 us; cnt = 32500610
Anderson              61045764 us; cnt = 32500610
8x shift and add       6712049 us; cnt = 32500610
32x shift and add      6662200 us; cnt = 32500610

For Intel Core2 Duo E8400, with gcc 4.7.1 (g++ -O3 popcnt.cpp -o popcnt -mssse3, -mpopcnt is not supported on this CPU)

Bitslice(7)            1353007 us; cnt = 32500610
Bitslice(24)            953044 us; cnt = 32500610
Lauradoux               534697 us; cnt = 32500610
SSE2 8-bit              458277 us; cnt = 32500610
SSE2 16-bit             555278 us; cnt = 32500610
SSE2 32-bit             634897 us; cnt = 32500610
SSSE3                   414542 us; cnt = 32500610
16-bit LUT             1208412 us; cnt = 32500610
8-bit LUT              1400175 us; cnt = 32500610
gcc popcount           5428396 us; cnt = 32500610
gcc popcountll         2743358 us; cnt = 32500610
FreeBSD version 1      3025944 us; cnt = 32500610
FreeBSD version 2      2313264 us; cnt = 32500610
Wikipedia #2           1570519 us; cnt = 32500610
Wikipedia #3           1051828 us; cnt = 32500610
HAKMEM 169/X11         3982779 us; cnt = 32500610
naive                 20951420 us; cnt = 32500610
Wegner/Kernigan       13665630 us; cnt = 32500610
Anderson               6771549 us; cnt = 32500610
8x shift and add      14917323 us; cnt = 32500610
32x shift and add     14494482 us; cnt = 32500610

Bitslice method is a parallel mechanism that counts multiple (7 or 24) machine words at a time so it has marginal usability for a generic function. After http://dalkescientific.com/writings/diary/popcnt.cpp :

static inline int popcount_fbsd2(unsigned *buf, int n)
{
  int cnt=0;
  do {
    unsigned v = *buf++;
    v -= ((v >> 1) & 0x55555555);
    v = (v & 0x33333333) + ((v >> 2) & 0x33333333);
    v = (v + (v >> 4)) & 0x0F0F0F0F;
    v = (v * 0x01010101) >> 24;
    cnt += v;
  } while(--n);
  return cnt;
}

static inline int merging2(const unsigned *data) 
{
        unsigned count1,count2,half1,half2;
        count1=data[0];
        count2=data[1];
        half1=data[2]&0x55555555;
        half2=(data[2]>>1)&0x55555555;
        count1 = count1 - ((count1 >> 1) & 0x55555555);
        count2 = count2 - ((count2 >> 1) & 0x55555555);
        count1+=half1;
        count2+=half2;
        count1 = (count1 & 0x33333333) + ((count1 >> 2) & 0x33333333);
        count2 = (count2 & 0x33333333) + ((count2 >> 2) & 0x33333333);
        count1+=count2;
        count1 = (count1&0x0F0F0F0F)+ ((count1 >> 4) & 0x0F0F0F0F);
        count1 = count1  + (count1 >> 8);
        count1 = count1 + (count1 >> 16);

        return count1 & 0x000000FF;
}

static inline int merging3(const unsigned *data) 
{
        unsigned count1,count2,half1,half2,acc=0;
        int i;

        for(i=0;i<24;i+=3)
        {
                count1=data[i];
                count2=data[i+1];
                //w = data[i+2];
                half1=data[i+2]&0x55555555;
                half2=(data[i+2]>>1)&0x55555555;
                count1 = count1 - ((count1 >> 1) & 0x55555555);
                count2 = count2 - ((count2 >> 1) & 0x55555555);
                count1+=half1;
                count2+=half2;
                count1 = (count1 & 0x33333333) + ((count1 >> 2) & 0x33333333);
                count1 += (count2 & 0x33333333) + ((count2 >> 2) & 0x33333333);
                acc += (count1 & 0x0F0F0F0F)+ ((count1>>4) &0x0F0F0F0F);
        }
        acc = (acc & 0x00FF00FF)+ ((acc>>8)&0x00FF00FF);
        acc = acc + (acc >> 16);
        return acc & 0x00000FFFF;
}

/* count 24 words at a time, then 3 at a time, then 1 at a time */
static inline int popcount_24words(unsigned *buf, int n) {
  int cnt=0, i;

  for (i=0; i<n-n%24; i+=24) {
    cnt += merging3(buf+i);
  }
  for (;i<n-n%3; i+=3) {
    cnt += merging2(buf+i);
  }
  cnt += popcount_fbsd2(buf+i, n-i);
  return cnt;
}
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what's bitslice method? –  Karoly Horvath Aug 21 '12 at 14:02
    
@KarolyHorvath: bitslice function added, along with short description –  Hubert Kario Aug 21 '12 at 18:11
count = 0;
while (word != 0) {
  word = word & (word-1);
  count++;
}

The statement

word = word & (word-1);

clears the lowest 1-bit in the word. Eventually, you run out of 1-bits.

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I always prefer this method as it's platform / independent so works for any word size, and only iterates for the number of set bits, rather than the number of bits. To get what the original question requires, i.e. the count mod 2, you could just replace count++ with count = !count; –  NeilDurant Aug 21 '12 at 13:25

I think this is fairly easy to understand, and quite efficient.

x = some number;
x ^= (x >> 1); // parity of every bit pair now in bits 0, 2, 4, ...
x ^= (x >> 2); // parity of every 4 bits now in bits 0, 4, 8, ...
x ^= (x >> 4); // ...etc
x ^= (x >> 8);
x ^= (x >> 16); // parity of all 32 bits now in bit 0
parity = x & 1;
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How can you tell that it is "quite efficient"? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 21 '12 at 14:05
    
It does only 10 operations (5 >>s and 5 ^s), with no loops. Of course it depends on the compiler and the target processor. –  James Aug 21 '12 at 14:10
    
Problem is, all those operations are dependent, so instruction-level parallellism isn't possible. Modern processors can often perform multiple operations at once if they are not dependent -- so you may have better performance if your evaluation graph is tree-like rather than sequential. –  comingstorm Aug 22 '12 at 0:14

Precalculate all results and do a simple array lookup. For a simple "count even or odd" boolean result, you can make a bit array.

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I'm rather new to these things, you'll have to expand what you mean :P (thanks for trying though :D) –  Dubslow Aug 21 '12 at 12:36
    
a lookup for all possible 32 bit integers is a bit drastic (and sloooow) –  Karoly Horvath Aug 21 '12 at 13:12
    
@KarolyHorvath: lookup for 16 bit integers is small (and very fast). Lookup for 32bit integers would require ~4GB of memory for marginal speed-up... –  Hubert Kario Aug 21 '12 at 13:16
2  
@Hubert Kario: speed-up? lol... each lookup will probably create a cache-miss. that's orders of magnitude slower. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 21 '12 at 13:18
    
@KarolyHorvath: If you're doing popcounts over megabytes, it's still fastest, look at attached article to my answer. –  Hubert Kario Aug 21 '12 at 13:30
           cnt = 0;
           while (word != 0) {
           word = word & (word-1);
           cnt++;

this could remove 1 bits for more details visit http://pgrtutorials.blogspot.in/p/bit-manipulation.html

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