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I have a .csv that I need to convert to a coldfusion query. I have used the cflib.org CSVtoQuery method which works fine... but...

If there is a 'cell' in the csv that includes a comma in the string, such as a list, the query row for that record gets messed up as it sees the comma in the string as a new value.

I have no control over how the data is going in, so I can't have it written or passed inside quotes or the like.

Does anyone know if there is a way to process a .csv (convert to a query or other workable struct) that may have commas in the values?

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try cfhttp blog.dkferguson.com/index.cfm/2011/9/28/… – Henry Aug 21 '12 at 13:44
    
Thanks Henry.. have already tried that, but without success. Unfortuntely I am not getting isQuery(mycsv) returning a positive, and attempts to loop over the csv like a query fail. Thanks again Henry.. – Jason Aug 21 '12 at 13:51
1  
"I can't have it written or passed inside quotes or the like." - you mean the file is not a valid CSV file? – Peter Boughton Aug 21 '12 at 13:54
    
What Peter said... if you have a CSV that has commas that are not inside string delimiters, then it's completely invalid and can't be safely processed. – Dan Short Aug 21 '12 at 14:03
    
It's in export from a third party tool. Yes, lookng like an invalid csv, but it is what it is and all I have to work with. thanks guys. – Jason Aug 21 '12 at 14:14
up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, there isn't. Whoever is making the CSV is not making it properly. No CSV parser can tell the difference between commas that separate and commas that don't if there is no way to tell the difference.

Whoever is making the file should choose a different delimiter.

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2  
Yep. You must have something that allows you to distinguish a field. There's actually an RFC for the CSV format - tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4180 - which says "6. Fields containing line breaks (CRLF), double quotes, and commas should be enclosed in double-quotes." – Mark Aug 21 '12 at 18:48
    
True. Though he later said "if I open the csv in excel, it places values correctly". That strongly suggests the values are enclosed in quotes. Otherwise, Excel would have had the same problem. – Leigh Aug 21 '12 at 20:47
    
He also said in his original statement "I have no control over how the data is going in, so I can't have it written or passed inside quotes or the like." I was answering based on that. – Jason Dean Aug 21 '12 at 21:19
    
Thanks Jason. I have given this a good bash. But not to not to be. – Jason Aug 22 '12 at 13:41
    
@JasonDean - Sure, and that is what I would have answered too :) His later comments just raised some questions, because Excel should behave the same as any other parser. So maybe there was something more to the data than was not mentioned. But turns out that was probably a fluke and your initial answer was right on the money. – Leigh Aug 22 '12 at 16:18

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