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This one looks like a text wrap bug in webkit, or did i miss something?

DOM:

<div>
  <p>
    <img src="http://static.jsbin.com/images/favicon.png">
    no sea takimata sanctus estestest Lorem ...
  </p>
</div>

CSS:

div {
  width: 200px;
}

p {
 margin-right: 32px;
 padding-left: 30px;
}

img {
 float: left;
 margin-left: -30px;
}

wrong text wrap

Demo: http://jsbin.com/onoced/1/edit

Screenshots:

Chromium 22.0.1223.0 (149385) and Chrome 21.0.1180.79 Firefox 14.0.1 Opera 12.00

share|improve this question
    
I generally dont like overcomplicated css rules. If you just want to position the image, using the image as a background is a better approach. –  Kristof Dombi Aug 21 '12 at 14:02
    
in generally I agree with you, but i have some use cases where the background image approach won't work that easy. –  Burntime Aug 21 '12 at 14:15

11 Answers 11

up vote 8 down vote accepted
+50

I wouldn't say this is a bug, as you pointed out: it behaves equally in WebKit browsers. Otherwise we'd have to classify every single difference between Browser engines as bugs.

Though there are people who already reported a similar problem to Webkit.org: http://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=63074

But this is not just limited to paragraphs, same behaviour can be also found in lists and headers.

See example: http://jsbin.com/uzozus/1/edit

An explanation for this behaviour in Webkit browsers is:

If a negative margin is applied opposite a float, it creates a void leading to the overlapping of content.

Source: http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2009/07/27/the-definitive-guide-to-using-negative-margins/

Let's apply this to your example: your image width is 16px by 16px so in order to equalise this to the negative margin of 30px we have to add 14px horizontally

  img {
    float: left;
    margin-left: -30px;
    padding:5px 14px 0 0;
  }

See example: http://jsbin.com/onoced/37/edit

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry about the links but new users are just limited to post a maximum of two links per post. –  xapu Aug 29 '12 at 8:58

It certainly looks like a bug to me. If you're looking for a work-around, you should be able to wrap the image with a span, and float the wrapper span instead of the image.

like this:

<h2>Float Left</h2>
<div>
  <p>
    <span class="icon"><img src="http://static.jsbin.com/images/favicon.png"></span>
    no sea takimata <span class="hightlight">sanctus estestest</span> Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
  </p>
</div>

using these css rules, in place of your original img rule:

.icon {
  float: left;
}
.icon > img {
  margin-left: -30px;
  background: pink;
  padding: 5px 0;
}

Here's the modified example: http://jsbin.com/onoced/12/edit

share|improve this answer
    
why not just set the image to position: relative; And for your solution: Please explain the Level 3 selector, in this case .icon img would also works without problems. –  Burntime Aug 27 '12 at 9:36
    
I'm really not sure what you're suggesting. position:relative behaves differently from float: left, so the two are not interchangeable. Your question indicates that you're looking for the float behavior, not the position: relative behavior. || As for my use of the "child selector" (it is a CSS Level 2 Feature, not Level 3): You're right, a plain "descendant selector" would work, but I generally try to write the most specific rule that will suit my needs. In this case, that uses the "child selector". Change it if you like. –  Lee Aug 27 '12 at 16:34

Please try this code: i tested it on ie , mozilla , crome , opera and safari even.

tested in apple safari as well

http://jsfiddle.net/CrxQA/6/

in all browser its treating same and wrapped

share|improve this answer
    
good job you deserve bounty –  amit Aug 29 '12 at 14:33

This is my solution:

<style>
#main{
  width: 200px;
  height:200px;
}
#pic
{
    width:100px;/* or any size you like*/
    height:auto;
    float:left;
}
#txt
{
    width:100px;
    height:auto;
    float:left;
    overflow:hidden;
}
p 
{
 margin-right: 32px;
 padding-left: 30px;
}
</style>

HTML:

<div id="main">
    <div id="pic">
        <img src="http://static.jsbin.com/images/favicon.png"/>
    </div>
    <div id="txt">
          <p>
            no sea takimata sanctus estestest Lorem ...
          </p>
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure it's a bug, but it does appear to be limited to WebKit (tested in Safari as well). I have run into issue in the past with negative margins effecting parent elements.

In my experience negative margins can be unpredictable and as illustrated here, often display differently in different browsers. Is there any reason you can't use this type of layout...

http://jsbin.com/onoced/7/edit

share|improve this answer
    
I use this technique quite often. Without any (big) problems, this even works in MSIE6. There is a bigger chance to break stuff with floatings. –  Burntime Aug 23 '12 at 16:51

Looks like you've spotted a bug.

This is similar to another active bug concerning negative margins and text wrapping: Issue 141887. Chances are they're both related.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems like the bugs are not related the reported bug is a Chrome only bug. This one appears in all Webkit browsers (Except the Android Webkit browsers) –  Burntime Aug 23 '12 at 16:33
    
That's true, you're right. I didn't see it was only occurring in Chrome. –  depa Aug 23 '12 at 16:56

Yes, it looks like a bug. Another option you might consider is setting the display to block on the image and adding a negative bottom margin of 1 line.

img {
  display: block;
  margin-left: -30px;
  margin-bottom: -1em;
}

http://jsbin.com/onoced/10/edit

share|improve this answer
    
Invalid: "The P element represents a paragraph. It cannot contain block-level elements (including P itself)." w3.org/TR/html401/struct/text.html#h-9.3.1 –  Burntime Aug 27 '12 at 9:29
    
That is HTML specification. I'm sure that both the HTML and the CSS will validate in this case. –  Jasper de Vries Aug 27 '12 at 9:36

I don't know what your goal, but let's say that I don't like to throw the text in that way and I always prefer to put it in tags. So for me the best solution (bypassing the "bug"!?) is:

<div>
    <img>
    <p>text here </p>
</div>

or

<section>
    <div class="try">    
        <img>
        <p>text here </p>
    </div>
    <div class="try">    
        <img>
        <p>text here </p>
    </div>
    <div class="try">    
        <img>
        <p>text here </p>
    </div>
    .
    .
    .
</section>

Anyway you can use word-wrap property to adjuste your Ptag's tabulation.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no reason for additional markup. Also the image belongs to the paragraph. I don't agree with your solution. –  Burntime Aug 27 '12 at 9:27
    
There isn't additional markup. It is just no-anchored image. –  MatteoC Aug 27 '12 at 9:44

One easy way to fix this problem is to just push the image before the paragraph, and then remove the negative margin:

DOM:

<div>
  <img src="http://static.jsbin.com/images/favicon.png">
  <p>
    no sea takimata sanctus estestest Lorem ...
  </p>
</div>

CSS:

div {
  width: 200px;
}

p {
 margin-right: 32px;
 padding-left: 30px;
}

img {
 float: left;
 /* margin-left: -30px; */
}

Here is the modified JS Bin:

share|improve this answer

I don't know what your goal is, but let's say that I don't like to throw the text in that way and I always prefer to put it in tags. So for me the best solution (bypassing the "bug"!?) is:

<div>
 <img>     <p>text here </p> </div> 

or
<section> <div class="try"> <img> <p>text here </p> </div> <div class="try"> <img> <p>text here </p> </div> <div class="try"> <img> <p>text here </p> </div> . . .

Anyway you can use word-wrap property to adjuste your Ptag's tabulation.

share|improve this answer

As Jasper de Vries mentioned, I would set img to display:block. As margin with inline elements has unpredictable results. I would also set the p tag to display:block.

    <!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"> 
<title>JS Bin</title>
<style type="text/css">
  div {
    border: 1px solid red;
    margin: 20px 0;
    width: 200px;
  }

  p {
    background: #EEE;
    border-right: 1px solid green;
    margin: 0;
    margin-right: 20px;
    padding-left: 30px;
    display:block
  }

  img {
    background: pink;
    float: left;
    display:block;
    margin-left: -30px;
    padding: 5px 0;
  }

  .nf {
    float: none;
  }

  .abs {
    position: absolute;
  }

  .hightlight {
    background: rgba(255,255,0,0.2);
  }
</style>
</head>
<body>
  <h2>No Float</h2>
   <div>
    <p>
      <img class="nf" src="http://static.jsbin.com/images/favicon.png" alt="This make it W3C compliant">
      no sea takimata <span class="hightlight">sanctus estestest</span> Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
    </p>
  </div>
  <h2>Float Left</h2>
   <div>
    <p>
      <img src="http://static.jsbin.com/images/favicon.png" alt="This make it W3C compliant">
      no sea takimata <span class="hightlight">sanctus estestest</span> Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
    </p>
  </div>

  <h2>Position Absolute</h2> 
  <div>
    <p>
      <img class="abs fn" src="http://static.jsbin.com/images/favicon.png" alt="This make it W3C compliant">
      no sea takimata <span class="hightlight">sanctus estestest</span> Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
    </p>
  </div>
</body>
</html>

This code has been validated by the W3C latest standards. Copy and past the code into the validator to confirm.

W3C Validator By Input

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