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My table, "info", has 4 columns: bp, key, exp and job. I'm trying to create a function that searches for a term within a specified column:

Edit: Different problem, see 2nd code and 2nd error below

def search2(query, field):

    search_string = query    

    if field == "bp":
        cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE bp="+search_string)
    elif field == "key":
        cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE key="+search_string)
    elif field == "exp":
        cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE exp="+search_string)
    elif field == "job":
        cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE job="+search_string)

However, this raises an error, with "test" as search string and "bp" as column:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "C:\Users\user\Programs\time_database.py", line 32, in search2
    cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE bp="+search_string)
sqlite3.OperationalError: no such column: test

And by the way, "test" wasn't intended to be a column. I want it to be a search string that matches the specified column...

EDIT

Thanks Martijn Pieters for that, but now another error has surfaced. My code now is:

def search2(query, field):

    search_string = query    

    if field == "bp":
        cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE job=?", search_string)
    elif field == "key":
        cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE key="+search_string)
    elif field == "exp":
        cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE exp="+search_string)
    elif field == "job":
        cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE job="+search_string)

And the error I get is:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "C:\Users\gummi\Programs\time_database.py", line 32, in search2
    cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE job=?", search_string)
sqlite3.ProgrammingError: Incorrect number of bindings supplied. The current statement         uses 1, and there are 4 supplied.
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried to execute the resulting query with the sqlite3 command line tool on your database? Most probably you're just missing some quotes around test. – hochl Aug 21 '12 at 14:23
    
That was perhaps better posted as a quick comment on my answer; I had made a small mistake and did not put the search_string parameter in a tuple. Updated my answer below. – Martijn Pieters Aug 21 '12 at 14:32
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are not quoting the search string, and the database is interpreting it as a column name instead.

Use query parameters, these quote your search string automatically:

cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE job=?", search_string)

Next, if the field (column) value is not coming from an untrusted source (such as a web page) you can interpolate it directly into your query:

cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE %s=?" % field, (search_string,))

Now you no longer need all the branching.

If the field value does come from an untrusted source, the simplest thing is to just test if it is an allowed value:

def search2(query, field):
    if field not in set(['bp', 'key', 'exp', 'job']):
        raise ValueError('No such column ' + field)    
    cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE %s=?" % field, (query,))
share|improve this answer
2  
Also, protect you from little bobby tables. – Wooble Aug 21 '12 at 14:24
    
Pardon the language, but sweet Mother Marie. That was fast. – Gudmundur Aug 21 '12 at 14:27
    
@user1614466 -- That's Martijn Pieters for you. If you find that this answers you question, don't hesitate to mark it as accepted (click the little checkmark next to the answer). That lets others know that your problem has been solved. – mgilson Aug 21 '12 at 14:29
    
/me blows the smoke from his gun barrel. – Martijn Pieters Aug 21 '12 at 14:30
    
Sorry but I still have a problem Martijn. :D I used the code you provided in the edit and it now looks like this: Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> File "C:\Users\gummi\Programs\time_database.py", line 31, in search2 cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM info WHERE %s=?" % (field, search_string)) TypeError: not all arguments converted during string formatting – Gudmundur Aug 21 '12 at 14:34

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