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I am trying to create a stacked bar chart from some csv data. Having read Scott Murray's tutorial http://alignedleft.com/tutorials/d3/ (as an aside: this is the best tutorial on d3.js I have come across and should really be linked on the d3 wiki), as well as Andrew Davis' tutorials I a hashed together the following trial code to create the rects that I need:

window.onload = function()
{
var LikertData = [{a:0,b:1},{a:0,b:1},{a:0,b:1},{a:0,b:1},];
var w = 200;
var h = 200;

var svg = d3.select("body").append("svg")
        .attr("width", w)
        .attr("height", h);

var myG  = svg.selectAll("g")
        .data(LikertData)
        .enter()
        .append("g")
        .text(function(d)
        {
        var myRect = d3.selectAll("rect")
        .data(d.entries)
        .enter()
        .append("rect");
        return myRect;
            });
}

The idea is that for each array that forms the LikertData array, a rect is added to the parent g element. However, it doesn't work. Am I getting warm in the slightest?

Edit: this is closer to what I want - I have indicated the .data that is leaving me stumped and what I want to use for the data:

window.onload = function()
{
    d3.csv("likert.csv", function(LikertData){
        var svg = d3.select("body").append("svg")

        var myG  = svg.selectAll("g")
            .data(LikertData)
            .enter()
            .append("g")
            .selectAll("rect")
            .data()//<--I want data to use an array of key values for the parent g's d
            .enter()
            .append("rect");
    });
}

Using console.log(d3.entries(LikertData)) yields multiple objects as follows - so the data is associative:

[
Object
    key: "50"
    value: Object
        Agree: ""
        Always: "39.1%"
        Disagree: ""
        Neutral: ""
        Never: "4.3%"
        Row Labels: "I run out of time in long tasks"
        Sometimes: "52.2%"
        Strongly Agree: ""
        Strongly Disagree: ""
        Unanswered: "4.3%"
        __proto__: Object
    __proto__: Object
]
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2 Answers 2

Not too far away. Try

var LikertData = [{a:0,b:1},{a:0,b:1},{a:0,b:1},{a:0,b:1},];
var w = 200; var h = 200; 

var svg = d3.select("body").append("svg")
  .attr("width", w)
  .attr("height", h);

var myG  = svg.selectAll("rect")
  .data(LikertData).enter()
  .append("rect")
  .attr("x", function(d, i) { return i * 50; })
  .attr("y", function(d, i) { return i * 50; })
  .attr("width", 50)
  .attr("height", 50);

The x and y attributes position the rectangles and you need to give them a width and height. If you want to wrap them in a g element, simply add .append("g") before the call to data() -- this isn't necessary here though.

The text function should only be used to set text content -- don't use it to add new elements. You also don't have a nested array, so you need only one call to .data().

share|improve this answer
    
That's not quite what I'm after I'm afraid. The problem is that the csv import will give you the columns of the csv file as key values for each row. I want to end up with something like this: <g class="row1"> <rect "key1" /> <rect "key2" /> <rect "key3" /> </g> <g class="row2"> <rect "key1" /> <rect "key2" /> <rect "key3" /> </g> –  George of all trades Aug 21 '12 at 15:14
    
Then you need to nest the data that you're giving with a separate array for each row. Have a look at this tutorial for more detail. –  Lars Kotthoff Aug 21 '12 at 15:45
    
I had looked at nesting before. The problem is I don't want to nest my data based on key values - I want to actually use the key values as an array for .data(). I have edited the code above and shown a console output that should make things clearer. Thanks for your thoughts so far @Lars –  George of all trades Aug 21 '12 at 20:05
    
Ok, so currently you have a list of objects. You can pass this to .data() to add elements for each of these objects, but you want to organise them in rows (which presumably are determined by something in the data). While you can do that with just a flat array, it would be more "natural" with d3 to have an array of arrays -- instead of a flat list of objects, you have a list of list of objects. The individual objects would still have all the information, but you can have two .data() calls -- one for rows and one for the objects in each row. –  Lars Kotthoff Aug 21 '12 at 20:15
    
Came up with a simpler fix in the end: parsed the csv using parseRows to create a an array of arrays allowing me to use function(d){return d} as the data source at the point marked with the arrows. Thanks for all your help. –  George of all trades Aug 21 '12 at 23:01
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Final code simplified - changing the way the csv was parsed to make use of the parseRows function resulted in the creation of an array of arrays allowing me to the outer d as a source for .data:

window.onload = function()
{   
    d3.text("likert.csv", function(LikertData){
        var parsedData = d3.csv.parseRows(LikertData);

        var svg = d3.select("body")
        .append("svg");

        var g = svg.selectAll("g")
        .data(parsedData)
        .enter()
        .append("g");

        var gRect = g.selectAll("rect")
            .data(function(d){return d})
            .enter()
            .append("rect");

    });
}
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