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Consider this simple code:

"use strict";

var obj = {
    f: function() {
        this.prop = 'value';
        g.bind( this )();
    }
};

function g() {
    console.log( this.prop );
}

If I try to validate this code, jshint gives me the error Possible strict violation. where I call console.log( this.prop );. This is because this is undefined in strict mode in a function.

But I'm binding this function before calling it, so this is the correct object.

I'm using this "design pattern" to avoid cluttering the main object. Passing the properties in the parameters will also clutter the function, so I refuse to do this. Besides, this is exactly what bind is for.

Is there a way for jshint to let me do this?

share|improve this question
    
Is this maybe a bug in jshint? –  rlemon Aug 21 '12 at 14:46
    
Well, it's right in the fact that this is a possible strict violation. However, if it can't parse the bind matter, I think it should remain a warning, not an error. Dunno... –  Florian Margaine Aug 21 '12 at 14:47
    
But like you have mentioned; this is not an error because you have bound it first before calling it. Having it spew a warning probably isn't too helpful either because this is the intended purpose of .bind() –  rlemon Aug 21 '12 at 14:55
    
Yep... I've opened this issue in the jshint queue, but maybe there's a configuration way to change this? That's why I asked the question: to find a workaround (not too ugly), if any is possible. –  Florian Margaine Aug 21 '12 at 15:05
    
"this is exactly what bind is for" - Well, here, you may want to just do g.call(this), I guess. (Not sure if it solves the issue, though.) If you want to bind g by default, you could do var g = function() { }.bind(obj) instead, that stops jshint with complaining. –  pimvdb Aug 21 '12 at 17:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 61 down vote accepted

It is extremely hard to detect this case without running the code. You can use option validthis to suppress this warning:

"use strict";

var obj = {
    f: function() {
        this.prop = 'value';
        g.bind( this )();
    }
};

function g() {
    /*jshint validthis:true */
    console.log( this.prop );
}

It is to be noted that jshint comments are function scoped. So the comment will work for the function g and its inner functions, not just the next line.

share|improve this answer
    
Do I have to add this comment before every line where I use this? –  Florian Margaine Aug 21 '12 at 17:28
1  
No, options in JSHint are function scoped. So this comment will work within function g and its inner functions (if any). –  Anton Kovalyov Aug 22 '12 at 18:04
5  
But the dumb thing is that it's not a potential strict mode violation. Declaring a var without the var keyword would be a strict mode violation. This is just the wrong warning for an error that might result from attempting to access a property of undefined. It's a potential strict mode-related problem but the problem would have nothing to do with actually violating strict mode rules. –  Erik Reppen Aug 22 '12 at 22:39
3  
Or add "validthis": true to your .jshintrc –  Raine Feb 21 at 6:32
4  
@Raine this will disable the check for your entire codebase though. This is a special case, and should be handled specifically, not for the whole codebase. –  Florian Margaine May 16 at 12:42

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