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Here is a programming test used in a job interview. I find it has a very strange non-OO perspective and wonder why anyone would approach a constructor from this perspective. As a very experienced Java programmer, I immediately question the ability of the individual who wrote this code and the strange perspective of the question.

I find these strange out of context questions on interviews disturbing. I would love feedback from other experienced OO Java programmers.

Complete the Solver constructor so that a call to solveAll return a list with 2 values including the square root and the inverse of the integer passed as parameter.

public interface MathFunction {
    double calculate(double x);
}

public class Solver {

    private List<MathFunction> functionList;

    public Solver() { 

        //Complete here

    }

    public List<Double> solveAll(double x) {
        List<Double> result = new ArrayList<Double>();
        for (MathFunction function : this.functionList) {
            result.add(new Double(function.calculate(x)));
        }

        return result;
    }
} 
share|improve this question
2  
I don't find this strange or non-OO. But then again, I am not very experienced and am looking forward to some answers. ;) –  brimborium Aug 21 '12 at 14:54
27  
Do we need a new [I'm currently in an interview on my iPhone] tag to rival [homework]? :-) –  Duncan Aug 21 '12 at 14:55
3  
I think the point of this is to ensure that the interviewee does not attempt to call solveAll within the constructor. They simply want to see that you understand the code, and the fact that you manage to figure out that what you need to do is to create two MathFunction implementations and store them in the list so that they can be used at a later time by the solveAll method. –  Alderath Aug 21 '12 at 14:58
4  
Why does the question say that an integer is (to be) passed as parameter? –  aoeu Aug 21 '12 at 19:27
2  
It's a warning that your potential employer does not find code like this that alarming and is possibly quite common in the codebase they will have you maintain. run! before it's too late! –  Choy Aug 31 '12 at 6:58

8 Answers 8

Somewhat contrived, seems closer to the decorator pattern to me. Not sure what I would say during an interview but here is how I would code it:

package math;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class DecoratorMath 
{

    interface MathFunction 
    {
        double calculate(double x);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        DecoratorMath decoratorMath =  new DecoratorMath();
        decoratorMath.go();
    }

    public void go() 
    {
        Solver solver = new Solver();
        decorate(solver);
        List<Double> results = solver.solveAll(02);
        for (Double d :results) 
        {
            System.out.println(d);
        }
    }

    public void decorate(Solver solver)
    {
        solver.addFunction(new MathFunction() 
        {
            @Override
            public double calculate(double x) 
            {
                return Math.sqrt(x);
            }
        });

        solver.addFunction(new MathFunction() 
        {
            @Override
            public double calculate(double x) 
            {
                return 1d/x;
            }
        });
    }

    class Solver
    {
        private List<MathFunction> mathFunctions = new ArrayList<MathFunction>();

        public void addFunction(MathFunction mathFunction)
        {
            mathFunctions.add(mathFunction);
        }

        public List<Double> solveAll(double x) 
        {
            List<Double> result = new ArrayList<Double>();
            for (MathFunction function : mathFunctions) 
            {
                result.add(new Double(function.calculate(x)));
            }
            return result;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I agree that it's confusing and over-engineered.

But I do think the code is reasonably object-oriented. It's an instance of the strategy pattern. The code that generates a list of answers doesn't care how the answers are calculated - the two concerns are separated and a different calculation strategy could be applied without having to touch the code that generates the list.

To make the class more useful, these functions should be passed in from the outside (i.e. dependency injection) rather than being instantiated in the constructor.

You know the answer, I assume, but for what it's worth...

public Solver() {
    functionList = new ArrayList<MathFunction>();

    functionList.add(new MathFunction() {

        @Override
        public double calculate(double x) {
            return 1d/x;
        }
    });

    functionList.add(new MathFunction() {

        @Override
        public double calculate(double x) {
            return Math.sqrt(x);
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
I totally agree with you. –  gontard Aug 21 '12 at 15:12
    
A programmer could of spent the last 10 years using and coding factory patterns, strategy patterns, template patterns and implementing many inner classes and interfaces for many reasons. The programming question is not designed to find that out especially if it is a timed question. I need a rational perspective and context otherwise it is a silly exercise that leaves everyone guessing. –  user916115 Aug 21 '12 at 17:44
    
If I was in an interview I wouldn't argue "this is stupid it wouldn't ever come up in real life", I would get on with it and discuss it afterwards. –  Joe Aug 21 '12 at 18:38
    
If I were giving a question like this on a test, I'd be looking for the recognition of the better answer and an exposition as to why this way is better than the other. I always found the discussion of the questions and answers to be far more useful than the answers the interviewee responded with. –  Mark0978 Aug 28 '12 at 17:53
    
It's been a while since I last touched Java code, can you instantiate an interface like this these days? Pretty cool if so! –  Sebastian Blask Aug 28 '12 at 19:51

Ok, I coded the solution to my own question. My instinct that nothing should be in the constructor seems to be correct. The functionList is not static so you need an instance to initialize it. It specifies integer so I round to integer. The inverse function is not advanced math in any way.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.lang.Math;

public class Solver {

    private List<MathFunction> functionList = new ArrayList<MathFunction>();;

    public Solver() { 

// Complete here

    }

    public void initFunctionList() {

        MathFunction functionSquareRoot = new MathFunction(){

            @Override
            public double calculate(double x) {
                return (x<0 ? 0: Math.sqrt(x));  // maybe we need throw an exception here for negative numbers, but we'll just set it to 0
            }};

        MathFunction functionInverse = new MathFunction(){

            @Override
            public double calculate(double x) {
                return (x!=0.0 ? 1/x : 0);
            }

        };

        functionList.add(functionSquareRoot);
        functionList.add(functionInverse);

    }

    public List<Double> solveAll(double x) {
        List<Double> result = new ArrayList<Double>();

        for (MathFunction function : this.functionList) {
            result.add(new Double(function.calculate(x)));
        }

        return result;
    }

}


public interface MathFunction {
     double calculate(double x);
}


public class TestSolver {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Solver s = new Solver();
        s.initFunctionList();
        System.out.println(s.solveAll(16.0));

    }

}

I mislead myself the constructor can be

public Solver() { 

// Complete here
        MathFunction functionSquareRoot = new MathFunction(){

            @Override
            public double calculate(double x) {
                return (x<0 ? 0: Math.sqrt(x));  // maybe we need throw an exception here for negative numbers, but we'll just set it to 0
            }};

        MathFunction functionInverse = new MathFunction(){

            @Override
            public double calculate(double x) {
                return (x!=0.0 ? 1/x : 0);
            }

        };

        functionList.add(functionSquareRoot);
        functionList.add(functionInverse);

    }
share|improve this answer
    
why bother with the rounding? Just wondering if there's any particular reason. –  MartyE Aug 21 '12 at 21:30
    
@MartyE, the question says 'integer', so rounding is "needed" –  bestsss Aug 22 '12 at 1:26
    
@bestsss It still seems like you wouldn't want to round here. If anything, you would want to change double calculate(double x); to double calculate(int x); then convert x to a double. –  MartyE Aug 22 '12 at 1:47
    
Just asking, with this, don't you risk the 1/x1 with an int divided by a long resulting in 0 because of the rounding on int/long types? I don't have a Java compiler here to test with, so I am truly asking. –  MartyE Aug 22 '12 at 1:51
    
@MartyE, you work within the conditions given by the interviewer, i.e. double->double and stating integer. The wording is not smart and perhaps unintended but it's ok. If it's an integer division by zero it is an error and shall not be handled explicitly, imo. There is no rounding in int/long the int is promoted to long. Java has not bytecodes that operate on mixed types (it's either int:int or long:long). Also double can hold all int values w/o rounding error. –  bestsss Aug 22 '12 at 2:30

While I agree that this probably isn't the best way, or most OO way to do this, I would have to assume that the point of this exercise is to see how well you understand Inheritance, Interfaces and maybe anonymous inner classes. That's the only thing I can figure.

share|improve this answer
    
As @Joe points out in his answer, the other thing that this question is looking for, is to see if you can recognize the design pattern and implement it correctly. –  Jason Carter Aug 21 '12 at 14:55
    
The request to complete the constructor so that method x returns y is what initially throws me off. After analysis of what is there you can get the gist of what you can do. Use the MathFunction interface to implement 2 functions via inner classes. It is like a strategy pattern/template pattern/factory pattern but not quite. –  user916115 Aug 21 '12 at 16:59

Here's my solution. This is a simple illustration of a factory class.

public Solver() { 
    functionList = new ArrayList<MathFunction>();
    MathFunction sqrt = new MathFunction() {
        @Override
        public double calculate(double x) {
            return Math.sqrt(x);
        }

    };
    functionList.add(sqrt);
    MathFunction inverse = new MathFunction() {
        @Override
        public double calculate(double x) {
            return 1.0D / x;
        }

    };
    functionList.add(inverse);
}

This question shows two things:

  • Whether the programmer understands math terms like inverse.
  • Whether the programmer understands that instances of interfaces or classes can be stored in a list, and iterated over later.
share|improve this answer
1  
Another one who didn't read the question... The OP definitely knows how to do it. –  Martijn Courteaux Aug 21 '12 at 14:57
    
I explained what it was and (finally) provided a link to an explanation. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Aug 21 '12 at 15:04
1  
Actually, at least one of the "solutions" should be kept here. Because there might be some guys that don't know the answer and they might find one here and therefore might understand the "real" answers to this question better... –  brimborium Aug 21 '12 at 15:04
2  
Where is the the factory method pattern ? –  gontard Aug 21 '12 at 15:08
3  
@GilbertLeBlanc sorry, but I do not see the factory pattern here. "Like other creational patterns, it deals with the problem of creating objects (products) without specifying the exact class of object that will be created." You are simply instantiating an anonymous class and using it. Strategy would fit better here IMHO –  Oscar Aug 21 '12 at 16:55

This is testing your design patterns, by using the simplest possible method. I think this could be the Strategy (or some other behavioural pattern). See these:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy_pattern

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_pattern

If you are going for a Java interview, you should be able to identify the design pattern they are hinting at and that should prevent you from being too unsettled!

To answer the question, create two classes that implement MathFunction as required, then create two instances and store them in functionList.

The point here is not 'can you do calculations in this strange way', it is 'can you identify design patterns'.

share|improve this answer
    
You've only gone and given him the answer! ;-) –  Duncan Aug 21 '12 at 14:53
    
Nooo Joe! Put Strategy back. It's more of a Strategy than a Template –  jeff Aug 21 '12 at 14:54
    
@jeff - I put strategy back but it does look like template? I dunno it's been a couple of years since I thought about them by name –  Joe Aug 21 '12 at 14:55
    
@DuncanJones - I assume the interview's over! –  Joe Aug 21 '12 at 14:56
    
@Joe Maybe I'm too cynical. –  Duncan Aug 21 '12 at 14:57

I think they wanted you to add two items in the functionlist. Each one would implement the MathFunction interface, one for the square root and one for the inverse. The prboblem lies in the details:

1- You have a function which returns 2 values because it does two different things, that is bad

2- If you want to have this "do-it-all" class,m it would be interesting to receive the Mathfunctions as a parameter so you can do any sort of MathFunctions, the MathFunctions would be parameterizable

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IMHO, it is indeed a strange approach. The name Solver is generic, it shouldn't implement specific operations by default. However, maybe that was part of the interview? Part one: simply fulfill the request. Part two: say that it is strange to do so.

I would say that a much nicer approach would be to have an addMathFunction(MathFunction mf) method. And if wanted, to create subclasses that extend the Solver class and add MathFunctions in their constructor.

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