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Say I have vector:

x <- c(11,6,5,3,2,1,25,10,16,12,22,24,19,14,18,32,17,15,8,7,
       33,4,27,9,29,13,30,23,20,31,26,21,28)
x
[1] 11  6  5  3  2  1 25 10 16 12 22 24 19 14 18 32 17 15  8  7 33  4 27  9 29 13 30 23 20
[30] 31 26 21 28

I want to identify which elements are not ascending. So, for example, elements 2 to 5 (values 6,5,3,2,1) are out of order because they are less than element 1 (11). Then element 6 is in order because its greater than 11, then all elements until element 16 (32) are out of order. I want to remove those elements.

Vectorized/shortcut way of doing this?

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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Create some data:

set.seed(1)
x <- sample(100, 30)
x
[1] 27 37 57 89 20 86 97 62 58  6 19 16 61 34 67 43 88 83 32 63 75 17 51 10 21 29  1 28 81 25

Select only those elements that are greater than or equal to the cumulative maximum:

x[x >= cummax(x)]
[1] 27 37 57 89 97
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@ttmaccer Thanks. It just so happened that I spent a couple of hours thinking about this problem a few days ago :-) –  Andrie Aug 21 '12 at 15:27
    
I actually read the original question differently. I was going to answer by identifying every element for which x[j] <= x[j-1] . It sort of depends on whether JoshDG wants to remove just the currently offending elements, or essentially to recurse on my rule until he ends up with your rule. Look at 1,99,2,3,....98. Does it really make sense to toss everything, or to toss 99 ? Back to my usual question: "what is the actual problem you are trying to solve?" , I guess. –  Carl Witthoft Aug 21 '12 at 18:02
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