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Why does this code not compile?

public class x
{
    private void test()
    {
        handle(new ThingA());
        handle(new ModifiedThingA());
    }

    private <T extends BaseThing<T>, X extends T> java.util.List<T> handle(X object)
    {
        return object.getList();
    }

    private static class BaseThing<T extends BaseThing<T>>
    {
        public java.util.List<T> getList()
        {
            return null;
        }
    }

    private static class ThingA
        extends BaseThing<ThingA>
    {
    }

    private static class ModifiedThingA
        extends ThingA
    {
    }
}

Java 6 gives this this error in handle(new ModifiedThingA());:

x.java:6: <T,X>handle(X) in x cannot be applied to (x.ModifiedThingA)
            handle(new ModifiedThingA());
            ^

Java 7 does not even like handle(new ThingA());, this is the Java 7 output:

x.java:5: error: invalid inferred types for T; inferred type does not conform to declared bound(s)
            handle(new ThingA());
                  ^
    inferred: ThingA
    bound(s): CAP#1
  where T,X are type-variables:
    T extends BaseThing<T> declared in method <T,X>handle(X)
    X extends T declared in method <T,X>handle(X)
  where CAP#1 is a fresh type-variable:
    CAP#1 extends BaseThing<CAP#1> from capture of ?
x.java:6: error: invalid inferred types for T; inferred type does not conform to declared bound(s)
            handle(new ModifiedThingA());
                  ^
    inferred: ModifiedThingA
    bound(s): CAP#1
  where T,X are type-variables:
    T extends BaseThing<T> declared in method <T,X>handle(X)
    X extends T declared in method <T,X>handle(X)
  where CAP#1 is a fresh type-variable:
    CAP#1 extends BaseThing<CAP#1> from capture of ?
2 errors

It seems to me that javac is mistaking ModifiedThingA for a BaseThing<ModifiedThingA> when it is in fact a BaseThing<ThingA>. Is this my bug or javac's?

share|improve this question
    
What's the need for the X generic in the declaration of handle? Can't you just declare object to be of type T? –  Flavio Aug 21 '12 at 15:43
    
T extends BaseThing<T> would require ModifiedThingA to be a BaseThing<ModifiedThingA>. I want to accept anything that extends something like ThingA. ie. Anything that extends a valid implementation of T extends BaseThing<T>. –  Jesse Aug 21 '12 at 15:47
4  
Inference of types gets a bit complicated. Fwiw, you can ditch the inference and specify the generic arguments explicitly. Replace the body of test with this.<ThingA,ThingA>handle(new ThingA()); this.<ThingA,ModifiedThingA>handle(new ModifiedThingA()); –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 21 '12 at 15:47
1  
@TomHawtin-tackline You, sir, are a gentleman and a scholar! Put that in an answer and I'll accept it. –  Jesse Aug 21 '12 at 15:51
    
@TomHawtin-tackline's solutions solves my example code, but not my real life code. Is javac getting the inference wrong? Should I file a bug report? –  Jesse Aug 21 '12 at 15:58
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

javac's behavior appears to be correct. Theoretically one type variable, T, would be sufficient. However, you introduced a second type variable, X, to help type inference along. The argument for X gets inferred first and then, based on the invocation context, the argument for T is inferred:

List<ThingA> a = handle(new ThingA());
List<ThingA> b = handle(new ModifiedThingA());

However, your invocation context does not put any bounds on the return type. Thus the compiler is forced to introduce a type variable (CAP#1) with the null type as lower bound. T's argument will be inferred as glb(BaseThing<CAP#1>) = BaseThing<CAP#1>. Given its lower bound, X is not provably a subtype of T.

There are two or three ways out of this.

  1. manually infer (okay if rarely necessary)
  2. provide an "overload" with return type void (needs another name, urgh)
  3. if the returned list is immutable or a defensive copy, you can disconnect the type argument T from its bounds argument

I prefer option 3:

private <T extends BaseThing<T>> List<T> handle(BaseThing<? extends T> object) {
    return new ArrayList<T>(object.getList());
    // or (using guava's ImmutableList)
    return ImmutableList.copyOf(object.getList());
}

Happy generics.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, option 3 is a nice solution, simply changing the method signature to private <T extends BaseThing<T>> java.util.List<? extends T> handle(BaseThing<? extends T> object) worked for my case, after looking at your answer. –  Jesse Aug 22 '12 at 14:21
    
Thanks for making the effort to provide such a detailed answer. –  Jesse Aug 22 '12 at 14:22
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There seems to be a bug in javac 1.7.0_09 and 1.7.0_11, which causes this problem.

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