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I have a time series

mainTimeSeries <- data.frame(time=seq(as.POSIXct("2012/1/1"), as.POSIXct("2012/1/5"), "hour"), value=sample(1:10, 1))

I want to filter out all the data which is present in another series

badTimeSeries<-data.frame(startTime=seq(as.POSIXct("2012/1/3"), as.POSIXct("2012/1/4"), "hour"))
badTimeSeries$endTime <- badTimeSeries$startTime + 1800

Is there an existing function to filter out dates ? The results should be such that no element of mainTimeSeries should be between startTime and endTime of badTimeSeries.

share|improve this question
    
Check your data. What you provided does not have an endTime column. Also, mainTimeSeries is just a vector of times. Did you mean for it to be some sort of time series object? –  GSee Aug 22 '12 at 2:06
    
@GSee thank you for pointing out. Modified. –  2sb Aug 22 '12 at 17:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

lubridate is useful here. Without it you need to write your own checks for overlaps which is sorta a pain...

library(lubridate)

badRange <- as.interval(days(1), as.POSIXct("2012/1/3"))

> mainTimeSeries %within% badRange
 [1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
[22] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
[43] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
[64]  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
[85] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
> 

Or:

> mainTimeSeries[mainTimeSeries %within% badRange]
 [1] "2012-01-03 00:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 01:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 02:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 03:00:00 PST"
 [5] "2012-01-03 04:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 05:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 06:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 07:00:00 PST"
 [9] "2012-01-03 08:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 09:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 10:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 11:00:00 PST"
[13] "2012-01-03 12:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 13:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 14:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 15:00:00 PST"
[17] "2012-01-03 16:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 17:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 18:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 19:00:00 PST"
[21] "2012-01-03 20:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 21:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 22:00:00 PST" "2012-01-03 23:00:00 PST"
[25] "2012-01-04 00:00:00 PST"
> 

Using only base R:

bad_start <- as.POSIXct('2012/1/3')
bad_end   <- as.POSIXct('2012/1/4')
mainTimeSeries[mainTimeSeries > bad_end | mainTimeSeries < bad_start]
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 for using lubridate. –  Andrie Aug 21 '12 at 16:36
    
I'm adding a base R solution now. –  Justin Aug 21 '12 at 16:37
    
@Justin "Using only base R" solution you have used just one bad_start and bad_end dates but my question above has a series of bad_start and bad_end dates. –  2sb Aug 21 '12 at 20:52
    
@2sb Your question has a series of startTimes. I used a range from min(badTimeseries$startTime) to max(badTimeseries$startTime). If any mainTimeSeries value falls between then its dropped. same as mainTimeSeries[!mainTimeSeries %in% badTimeSeries$startTime] –  Justin Aug 21 '12 at 21:01
    
@Justin Sorry if i have not made the question clear but you can't take min() and max(). Each row of badTimeSeries makes a bad time range whereas there are lots of good time range between min(badTimeseries$startTime) and max(badTimeseries$startTime). Moreover Imagine min(mainTimeSeries$time)==min(badTimeSeries$startTime) and max(mainTimeSeries$time)==max(badTimeSeries$startTime), then going by your solutions there are no good data. –  2sb Aug 21 '12 at 21:05

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