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I am making a syntax coloring tool. I am currently writing the method to find and highlight the keywords, ex if then else.. I am sure there is a better (faster and more aesthetic) way to do this.

Below are two methods, the first I try and not to use any string methods except for length to try and improve speed.

The second I used string methods but I've been told they are slower then doing it the first way.

Which way is faster? And for the first one, the word is only highlighted when a space is after that word which is not right, any remedy for that too?

Code:

    private string[] m_keywords = new string[] { "GOTO", "IF", "THEN", "ELSE", "WHILE", "DO" };
    private int m_nShortestKeywordLength = 2;

    // lcpy_strLine is a copy in all uppercase of the current line I am processing

    private void ProcessKeywords(Color clr)
    {
        if(lcpy_strLine.Length > m_nShortestKeywordLength)
            for (int i = 0; i < m_keywords.Length; i++)
            {
                string curWord = m_keywords[i];
                int len = curWord.Length;
                for (int j = 0; j < lcpy_strLine.Length; j++)
                {
                    if (j + len < lcpy_strLine.Length)
                    {
                        int k = 0;
                        while (k < len && lcpy_strLine[j + k] == curWord[k])
                            k++;
                        if (k == len)
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine("Found Keyword");
                            SelectionStart = m_nLineStart + j;
                            SelectionLength = k;
                            SelectionColor = clr;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
    }

    private void ProcessKeywords2(Color clr)
    {
        /*for (int i = 0; i < m_keywords.Length; i++)
            if (lcpy_strLine.Contains(m_keywords[i]))
            {
                int indx1 = lcpy_strLine.IndexOf(m_keywords[i]);
                SelectionStart = m_nLineStart + indx1;
                SelectionLength = m_keywords[i].Length;
                SelectionColor = clr;
            }*/

    }
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I'd use regular expressions, e.g. (GOTO|IF|THEN|ELSE|...) –  minitech Aug 21 '12 at 17:10
1  
Don't prematurely optimize your code. Write it in the way that's most readable and maintainable, and then revisit the code later if performance is an issue. –  Daniel Mann Aug 21 '12 at 17:11
    
But in any case, your ProcessKeywords2 does twice as much searching as it needs to. IndexOf returns -1 if the string does not contain the keyword, so check that and use the same result for indx1. –  minitech Aug 21 '12 at 17:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The easiest way to do this would probably be a regular expression. It'll be reasonably fast, too.

private string[] m_keywords = new string[] { "GOTO", "IF", "THEN", "ELSE", "WHILE", "DO" };
private Regex keywordRegex = new Regex(@"\b(" + string.Join("|", m_keywords) + @")\b", RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

And no need to uppercase the line:

private void ProcessKeywords(Color clr)
{
    foreach (Match m in keywordRegex.Matches(someLine)) {
        SelectionStart = m.Index;
        SelectionLength = m.Length;
        SelectionColor = clr;
    }
}
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When using string.IndexOf, you need to specify StringComparison.Ordinal to get good performance. The default overload uses a culture-aware comparison (e.g. it considers "æ" equal to "ae"), which is a lot more expensive than a simple character-by-character comparison.

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