Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking at Bouncy Castle to see how the performance of its hash algorithms compare to that of the .NET Framework, and it doesn't look too great; the MD5 implementation is around 6x slower than .NET's, and the SHA256 implementation is around 3x slower than .NET's.

So I want to make sure I'm using Bouncy Castle correctly, since the documentation is virtually non-existent. Here's what I'm doing:

using Org.BouncyCastle.Crypto;
using Org.BouncyCastle.Crypto.Digests;

public byte[] Hash(string filename)
{
  IDigest hash = new Sha256Digest();

  byte[] result = new byte[hash.GetDigestSize()];

  using (var fs = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, 
    FileShare.Delete | FileShare.ReadWrite))
  {
    byte[] buffer = new byte[4092];
    int bytesRead;

    while ((bytesRead = fs.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
    {
      hash.BlockUpdate(buffer, 0, bytesRead);
    }

    hash.DoFinal(result, 0);
  }

  return result;
}

EDIT

For comparison, here's how I'm doing it with .NET:

public byte[] Hash(string filename)
{
  byte[] hashBytes;
  HashAlgorithm hash = new SHA256CryptoServiceProvider();

  using (var fs = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, 
    FileShare.Delete | FileShare.ReadWrite))
  {
    try
    {
      hashBytes = hash.ComputeHash(fs);
    }
    finally
    {
      hash.Clear();
    }
  }

  return hashBytes;
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you post the code that you're comparing it with to get the "around 6x slower" and "around 3x slower" numbers? Are your results matching? –  Luke Aug 21 '12 at 18:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

While it is possible that the two algorithms are so vastly different that you experience a differential of 3-6x, it is also likely that the issue is a result of an I/O difference. By passing in a FileStream to the .NET implementation, it is possible that it is doing some clever things internally to achieve better I/O performance (such as hashing and reading concurrently) that you are not doing in your Bouncy Castle example.

To test this you can either:

  1. Make your two examples as similar as possible (this is what I would do). You can use TransformBlock and TransformFinalBlock in the .NET HashAlgorithm that will be more similar to your Bouncy Castle test.

  2. Try to make I/O optimizations to your Bouncy Castle code and see if you can approach the performance of the .NET implementation.

This may be moot though. If the .NET implementation meets your needs, it may be the best fit for your application. It seems that it may already have some performance characteristics built in that you would have to add manually to the Bouncy Castles implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried 64K buffer (65536 bytes), made no real difference –  Cocowalla Aug 21 '12 at 18:10
    
@Cocowalla You could also try using TransformBlock and TransformFinalBlock in the .NET implementations to make your tests more similar. That would tell you if the underlying hash algorithms performed similarly. If those results come out close, then it is most likely an I/O difference. –  Luke Aug 21 '12 at 18:19
    
I tried that, and the .NET implementation actually performed about another 6% faster - so it looks pretty conclusive that the Bouncy Castle implementation is just much slower than .NET's –  Cocowalla Aug 21 '12 at 18:54
    
@Cocowalla Excellent - that sounds like a solid result. Good to know too. :) –  Luke Aug 21 '12 at 18:57
    
FYI I have done something very similar and didn't use filestreams. I had to push the buffer up to 16mb to get the best performance. Perhaps try increasing your buffer more. –  Peter Oct 5 '12 at 8:27

The first thing you should check is whether you're IO-bound or CPU-bound. If you're CPU-bound, then I suspect that is Bouncy Castle. If you're IO-bound, it could be that .NET is being smarter about the IO. To start with, you might want to increase your buffer size from 4K to (say) 64K. Just give it a try. That's a really easy change. A harder change would be to use async IO so that you're reading the next buffer's-worth of unhashed data while you're hashing the data you've already got.

share|improve this answer
    
Bouncy Castle version only uses ~12% CPU, which I guess suggests it is IO bound - but increasing the buffer size made no discernible difference –  Cocowalla Aug 21 '12 at 18:09
    
@Cocowalla: 12% CPU on an 8 processor box is basically processor-bound. Do you have 8 processors, or 4+hyperthreading? –  Jon Skeet Aug 21 '12 at 18:34
    
I hadn't though about it like that - yes, it's a quad-core with hyperthreading (so, 8 'logical processors). Just checked, and CPU usage peaks the same at ~12% with all of the algorithms I'm looking at –  Cocowalla Aug 21 '12 at 18:38
    
@Cocowalla: In that case it sounds like it's just a matter of Bouncy Castle being less efficient, I'm afraid :( –  Jon Skeet Aug 21 '12 at 18:39
    
Thanks for your help with this - I'd accept both answers if I could, but Luke's was a bit more specific in allowing me to nail it down. You'll have to make do with an upvote ;) –  Cocowalla Aug 21 '12 at 19:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.