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I have a class and that calls another class. Like:

class Caller
{
    public void LetsCall()
    {
        abstractA a = new ConcreteA();
        a.DoSomething();
    }

}
public abstract class abstractA
{
    public virtual void DoSomething()
    {
    }

}

class ConcreteA : abstractA
{
    public override void DoSomething()
    {
        base.DoSomething();
        Functions.Doit();
    }
}

class Functions
{
    public static void Doit()
    {
        //Some more work
    }
}

like to know "ConcreteA" class is an Adapter here and Function class is an adaptee?

Can any one explain characteristics of an Adapter. Is it ok to have other methods apart from a method which calls method in adaptee.
Thank you,

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1 Answer 1

This just looks like polymorphism and composition. The idea of adapter is a "wrapper" that dispatches to some underlying object. The point of having an adapter is to allow existing code to conform to a particular interface.

One example I always see, is say I have a shape library that I wrote and I have the following interface.

 public interface Shape {
    double getArea();
 }

Now I found some cool Circle implementation in another library and I want to use it in my system, but there is no getArea() method. here it is:

public class SomeonesCircle {
   public double getRadius() { return radius; }
}

So for me to make it a "Shape" in my system, I can introduce an adapter:

public class CircleAdapter implements Shape {

   private final SomeonesCircle theCircle;

   public CircleAdapter (SomeonesCircle theCircle) { this.theCircle = theCircle; }

   public double getArea() {
     return theCircle.getRadius() * theCircle.getRadius() * Math.PI;
   }
}

// Somewhere else I can now do
Shape shape = new CircleAdapter(new SomeonesCircle(radius));

So now I can use the existing code as a Shape - that is, I adapted it. I don't see this same idea in your example code. Perhaps, if you use actual concrete ideas it will be more clear.

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Thank you...... –  Harsha Aug 22 '12 at 8:57

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