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I have implemented a Queue using 2 Stacks in Java where I follow this algorithm:

enQueue(x)
Push x to stack1

deQueue()
1) If both stacks are empty then error.
2) If stack2 is empty while stack1 is not empty, push everything from stack1 to stack2.
3) Pop the element from stack2 and return it.

Now, the problem here is that the first deQueue() operation is very slow (since it transfers everything to stack2). Can we modify the algorithm somehow so that deQueue is O(1) always? Are there other alternatives?

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1  
What data model are you using to store the queues? –  JustinKSU Aug 21 '12 at 18:36
4  
What you already have is amortized O(1). –  Louis Wasserman Aug 21 '12 at 18:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can swap the two stacks.

deQueue()

  1. If both stacks are empty then error.
  2. If stack2 is empty, while stack1 is not empty, swap the two stacks.
  3. Pop the element from stack2 and return it.

Using a swap, the operation is always O(1)

If you need a FIFO queue, use two queues. Only use a stack if you need LIFO behaviour.

If this is the case, there is no difference between using one queue or two queues, so you may as well use just one queue. If you are using threads, use an ExecutorService which wraps a Queue and a thread pool.

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but then enqueue(1); enqueue(2); dequeue() returns 2, doesn't it? I would expect it to return 1. –  Kevin Aug 21 '12 at 18:41
    
"push everything from stack1 to stack2." I will assume that means take one element at a time and push to stack 2, which will reverse the order of stack. –  Kamal Aug 21 '12 at 18:41
    
In that case it makes no sense to use a stack because two LIFOs makes a single FIFO queue. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 21 '12 at 18:49
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i think it's an interview question - i have heard this one in an interview before at least (but without the O(1) constraint) –  jeff Aug 21 '12 at 19:13

I'll bite: Why not use a doubly linked list? This should be O(1) push and O(1) pop.

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Note that java.util.LinkedList implements the Queue and Deque interfaces. –  lbalazscs Aug 21 '12 at 18:48

When we say first deQueue() operation is very slow (since it transfers everything to stack2).

I am assuming we are talking about this

2) If stack2 is empty while stack1 is not empty, push everything from stack1 to stack2.

Are we simply transferring everything we have in stack1 to stack2, in same order. That will be simple assignment (stack2=stack1;) and hence O(1).

Alternatively, if we are saying we need to pop everything from stack1, one by one, and add to stack2. We are basically talking about reversing a list(stack1), and assigning to stack2 (assignment is O(1), we know). There are various good algorithms to reverse a list http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/27742/How-To-Reverse-a-Linked-List-3-Different-Ways.

If you are using Java(as per the tag), you could simple use Collections.reverse(arrayList); to reverse the list.

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