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I have a project with a dropdown menu. here is the HTML:

<div class="body">
        <div class="head"></div>
        <div class="navbar">
            <div>Home</div>
            <div id="items"><p>Items</p>
                <div class="idd">
                    <table class="dd">
                        <tr>
                            <td><a href="./items/weapons.html">Weapons</a></td>
                        </tr>
                        <tr>
                            <td><a href="./items/abilities.html">Abilities</a></td>
                        </tr>
                        <tr>
                            <td><a href="./items/armor.html">Armor</a></td>
                        </tr>
                        <tr>
                            <td><a href="./items/rings.html">Rings</a></td>
                        </tr>
                    </table>
                </div>
            </div>

            <div>Sets</div>
            <div>Contact</div>
            <div>Info</div>
            <div>Donations</div>
        </div>
    </div>

So, now here's the CSS:

div.body {
width: 1000px;
margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;
margin-top: 15px;
}
div.body div.head {
background-image: url("header.png");
width: 995px;
height: 200px;
margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;
}
div.navbar div {
font-size: 13pt;
padding-top: 10px;
display: inline-block;
margin-left: 10px;
padding-left: 8px;
padding-right: 8px;
padding-bottom: 10px;
}
div.navbar div:hover {
background-color: #666;
}
div.navbar {
font-family: 'HelveticaNeue';
background-image: url("../newsdcs/navbarbg.png");
width: 730px;
height: 40px;
margin-top: 15px;
border-radius: 5px;
text-align: center;
margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;
color: #F0F0F0;
}
div.navbar div p {
margin-top: 0;
margin-bottom: 0;
}
div.navbar div div.idd {
background-color: #666;
position: absolute;
}
a {
color: white;
text-decoration: none;
}

Yes, and here's the JQuery:

$(document).ready(function(){
            window.onload = function() {
                if(!window.location.hash) {
                    window.location = window.location + '#l';
                    window.location.reload();
                }
            }
            $(".idd").hide();
            var eTop = $('#items').offset().top;
            var eLeft = $('#items').offset().left;
            var eTopA = eTop + 40;
            var eLeftA = eLeft;
            $(".idd").offset({ top: eTopA, left: eLeftA });
            $("#items").hover(function() {
                $(".idd").show();
            }, function() {
                $(".idd").hide();
            });
        });

And on every person's browser and computer they get a different result. A little off center, way in the wrong place, refresh and you get the right result, wrong result, whatever. How do I make a consistent, on center, correct and consistent drop down menu? Many thanks!

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5 Answers

If you want cross browser consistency, you have about two options:

Load different stylesheets for different browsers, using

<!-- [if IE]>
// Use this stylsheet
<![endif]>

You get the point.

Your other option, is to strip away as much margin and padding, and anything else that browsers interpret differently, and simplify as much as possible, and then reposition your elements.

Also not that iff you are applying styles to differnet tags to make them look the same, different tags look different in different browsers.

Welcome to cross-browser!
-Brian

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I see a ton of extra margins, etc that you probably don't need. It looks to me like you're setting top and left for the table's wrapper using javascript. Rather than doing that, I'd set position:relative to the container of that wrapper and then set left:0 and top:35px (or whatever position you're looking for). This will greatly simplify your JS.

I added these changes and it seems to stay consistent.

div#items {position:relative;}
div.navbar div div.idd {
    left:0;top:35px;
}

The benefit of doing it all with CSS is that the table wrapper (div.idd) will always position relative to div#items so they you'll only need to worry about the position of div#items. Cross browser support is an art form in itself.

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I do not want to critisize you, but i think you are taking the wrong approach here. I believe you are overcomplicating things. A few remarks:

Do not use tables for non tabular data. It will kill you SEO wise! Menu's are lists of links, and should be coded as such. Submenu should be coded as nested lists. A small example:

<ul id='nav'>
  <li><a ..>top 1</a></li>
  <li><a ..>top2</a>
    <ul>
      <li><a ..>sub 1</a>
      <li><a ..>sub 2</a>
      ...
    </ul>
  </li>
  ...
</ul>

I would strongly advise against using js for something as basic as a main navigation. What about the users that have js disabled (yes, they do exist :-s), they won't be able to navigate your site. Always try to apply the principles of graceful degrading. And in this case, a basic dropdown menu, absolutly no js is required. It is possile with just a few lines of basic css that wil work for everyone. Try some tutorial, something like this perhaps http://onwebdev.blogspot.com/2011/04/css-drop-down-menu-tutorial.html (just my first result on Google, there should be plenty good tuts out there)

Hope this puts you on the right track...

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Absolutely. This is a list, not a table, and should be treated as such. –  illbzo1 Aug 21 '12 at 21:43
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I think something like this might help. It's a basic jQuery dropdown menu that should look the same across all browsers. I'd suggest leaving all positioning styles in the stylesheet if it's possible, which in this case it is.

http://jsfiddle.net/UrGfZ/

PeterVR made a good point as well. If you're concerned about users blocking JS and want to set your navigation up with good ol' fashioned HTML/CSS, the fiddle below will work. The only changes I've made between the two jsFiddle projects is manually adding the class 'hasSubNav' to the li's and adding one line to the CSS to display the sub on hover.

http://jsfiddle.net/YzPaE/

The two look identical, it just depends on how far you want to go with your menu. If you're going to animate the dropdown etc. then jQuery would be the way to go, otherwise the pure CSS version works like a charm.

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I'm a bit unclear as to why you want to use jQuery for simple navigation as opposed to just using CSS.

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Now, how exactly would I do that? –  Snarky Theman Aug 22 '12 at 4:43
    
Here's a simple example: w3schools.com/css/css_navbar.asp –  illbzo1 Aug 22 '12 at 20:41
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