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I have such a function...

 function size {

      export FILENAME=$1

      export SIZE=$(du -sb $FILENAME | awk '{ print $1 }')

      awk 'BEGIN{x = ENVIRON["SIZE"]
                 split("Byte KiloByte MegaByte GigaByte TeraByte PetaByte ExaByte ZettaByte YottaByte", type)
                 for(i=8; y < 1; i--)
                     y = x / (2**(10*i))
                     print y " " type[i+2]
      }'

 }

size "/home/foo.bar" # 1 MegaByte

how can I insert: print y " " type[i+2]

to variable: SIZE_FILE ?

test: SIZE_FILE=${print y " " type[i+2]} # error :-(

Thank you very much

share|improve this question
    
Please read this –  alfasin Aug 21 '12 at 19:36
    
du -hs $FILENAME | awk '{print $1}' would seem to be much easier. –  j.w.r Aug 21 '12 at 19:37
    
Note that 1024 bytes is a kibibyte (KiB). A kilobyte (kB) is 1000 bytes. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KiB –  geirha Aug 21 '12 at 20:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The $( expr ) construct will save the result of evaluating "expr" in to a variable:

 theDate=$(date)

You can also use backticks, but I think the $() is more readable:

   theDate=`date`

So for your scripts, you'll use:

    function size {

          export FILENAME=$1

          SIZE=$(du -sb $FILENAME | awk '{ print $1 }')

          export FILE_SIZE=$(awk -v x=$SIZE 'BEGIN{
                     split("Byte KiloByte MegaByte GigaByte TeraByte PetaByte ExaByte ZettaByte YottaByte", type)
                     for(i=8; y < 1; i--)
                         y = x / (2**(10*i))
                         print y " " type[i+2]
          }')

    echo $FILE_SIZE

 }
share|improve this answer
1  
Also, Do you really want to export all of the variables? –  Dave Aug 21 '12 at 19:36
    
Thank you for your help. No, just a variable named $FILE_SIZE. Is there something wrong? –  Charlie Aug 21 '12 at 19:45
    
Instead of exporting the variable, just pass it into awk with the -v flag: awk -v x=$SIZE '...'. No need at all to export FILENAME or FILE_SIZE. –  chepner Aug 21 '12 at 19:53
    
You don't need the "export" part unless you need those variables to be accesible to the caller. –  Dave Aug 21 '12 at 19:55
    
So is it good? FILE_SIZE=$(awk -v 'BEGIN{x=$SIZE ? –  Charlie Aug 21 '12 at 20:09

You can do this without awk, which is more suited for processing text files.

function size () {

    # Non-environment variables should be lowercased
    # Always quote parameter expansions, in case they contain spaces
    local filename="$1"

    # Simpler way to get the file size in bytes
    local size=$(stat -c%s "$filename")

    # You could put all the units in an array, but we'll keep it simple.
    for unit in Byte KiloByte MegaByte GigaByte TeraByte PetaByte ExaByte ZettaByte YottaByte; do
        echo "$size $unit"
        (( size /= 1024 ))
    done

}

sizes=$( size $myfile )
share|improve this answer
    
All results are displayed at the same time... –  Charlie Aug 21 '12 at 20:16

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