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I'm just trying to fetch and old commit to my new machine using this commands:

$ git init
$ git remote add origin git@bitbucket.org:tirengarfio/home_folder
$ git fetch origin b914d217911c43afe1a59c4847eed5c44319

but it says:

fatal: Couldn't find remote ref b914d217911c43afe1a59c4847eed5c44319

Any help?

Note 1: I'm retrieving the commit number from the url. You know, after pressing to the link-number that appears in the row's commit, the page related to the commit is shown. That url contains the number I say. This is:

https://bitbucket.org/tirengarfio/home_folder/changeset/b914d217911c43afe1a59c4847eed5c44319c6bf

Note 2: I dont have any problem doing a plain checkout.

Regards

Javi

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What's wrong with normal git fetch? That'll grab that commit an any others on the remote, then you can just use git show <hash> to see the change locally. –  Christopher Aug 21 '12 at 20:01
    
@Christopher I did 'git fetch' but it downloads to my pc the last commit files... I'm interested in downloading the old revision files that I mention in my question. –  ziiweb Aug 21 '12 at 20:17
    
Is this old commit still in the ancestry of one of the existing branches (in which case, git fetch will have made sure you have a copy of it, so you can just git checkout), or might it have been in a branch that was never pushed, or has been deleted/pruned or was never merged into one of the branches that currently exists? –  twalberg Aug 21 '12 at 20:22
    
@twalberg I have just a master branch with several commits..Is enough answer? :) –  ziiweb Aug 21 '12 at 21:37
    
If you have never had any other branches, then all old commits should already be in your repository, unless you've used a shallow clone, or rewritten your master branch in some way (git filter-branch or git rebase) that resulted in either the particular commit you're looking for being removed or merged with another commit, or just having it's SHA changed due to having a different parent. If you do git log --pretty=oneline | grep b914d2, does the commit show up? –  twalberg Aug 21 '12 at 21:41

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