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How do you obtain the clicked mouse button using jQuery?

$('div').bind('click', function(){
    alert('clicked');
});

this is triggered by both right and left click, what is the way of being able to catch right mouse click? I'd be happy if something like below exists:

$('div').bind('rightclick', function(){ 
    alert('right mouse button is pressed');
});
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11 Answers 11

up vote 521 down vote accepted

As of jQuery version 1.1.3, event.which normalizes event.keyCode and event.charCode so you don't have to worry about browser compatibility issues. Documentation on event.which

event.which will give 1, 2 or 3 for left, middle and right mouse buttons respectively so:

$('#element').mousedown(function(event) {
    switch (event.which) {
        case 1:
            alert('Left Mouse button pressed.');
            break;
        case 2:
            alert('Middle Mouse button pressed.');
            break;
        case 3:
            alert('Right Mouse button pressed.');
            break;
        default:
            alert('You have a strange Mouse!');
    }
});
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2  
@Jeff Hines - I was trying to detect a right click in Chrome and the implementation shown here appeared to work fine, but I realized that was only because the alert() prevented the context menu from appearing. :( boo –  jinglesthula Nov 28 '11 at 22:47
10  
Keep scrolling down and make sure to read @JeffHines's answer. Basically, jQuery has this built-in as the event 'contextmenu'. –  jpadvo Dec 17 '11 at 20:30
5  
@jpadvo jQuery did not build it as "contextmenu", contextmenu is native of the browser. in native JavaScript you can attach to the oncontextmenu event. –  Neal Aug 20 '12 at 13:12
2  
ie8: Unable to get value of the property 'which': object is null or undefined –  Syom Mar 14 '13 at 16:08
2  
Can I prevent the context menu from coming up after the event is fired? –  hellohellosharp Apr 6 '13 at 3:07
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This is what worked for me:

$('.element').bind("contextmenu",function(e){
   alert('Context Menu event has fired!');
   return false;
}); 

In case you are into multiple solutions ^^

Edit: Tim Down brings up a good point that it's not always going to be a right-click that fires the contextmenu event.

Edit 2: Changed to work for dynamically added elements using .on() in jQuery 1.7 or above:

$(document).on("contextmenu", ".element", function(e){
   alert('Context Menu event has fired!');
   return false;
});

Demo: jsfiddle.net/Kn9s7/5

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20  
This should be the accepted answer. This event works in all relevant browsers and triggers on a whole click (mouse down + mouse up in proximity). –  Nick Retallack Dec 16 '11 at 18:18
2  
This is the only solution that worked for me with regards to capturing the right click on a <textarea> –  styler1972 Dec 19 '11 at 5:07
7  
Right-clicking is not the only way to trigger the context menu though. –  Tim Down Nov 1 '12 at 14:55
1  
I think it's the wrong approach because the contextmenu event firing does not always imply that the right mouse button was clicked. The correct approach is get button information from a mouse event (click in this case). –  Tim Down Nov 2 '12 at 16:06
1  
Hey! Thanks, this looks great, but I cant get it to bind to an element like a table row or even the body. it works with $(window). Im using backbone.js to populate a area #main with new content etc. –  Harry Jan 15 '13 at 8:30
show 4 more comments

You can easily tell which mouse button was pressed by checking the which property of the event object on mouse events:

/*
  1 = Left   mouse button
  2 = Centre mouse button
  3 = Right  mouse button
*/

$([selector]).mousedown(function(e) {
    if (e.which === 3) {
        /* Right mouse button was clicked! */
    }
});
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1  
The jQuery plugin linked above is using e.button==2 instead. –  ceejayoz Oct 29 '09 at 22:33
4  
yep. Using event.button cross browser is more of a problem than event.which as the numbers used for the buttons in event.button vary. Take a look at this article from Jan 2009 - unixpapa.com/js/mouse.html –  Russ Cam Oct 29 '09 at 22:37
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You can also bind to contextmenu and return false:

$('selector').bind('contextmenu', function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    //code
    return false;
});

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/WS9S2/

Or you can make a quick plugin that does the same:

(function( $ ) {
  $.fn.rightClick = function(method) {

    $(this).bind('contextmenu rightclick', function(e){
        e.preventDefault();
        method();
        return false;
    });

  };
})( jQuery );

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/WS9S2/2/


Using .on(...) jQuery >= 1.7:

$(document).on("contextmenu", "selector", function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    //code
    return false;
});  //does not have to use `document`, it could be any container element.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/WS9S2/283/

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1  
@Raynos yes, but that is the only way to handle a right-click event. if the context menu was still there then you could not do anything on a right click. –  Neal Dec 13 '11 at 15:53
1  
@Raynos - there are many cases where your point is not valid, such as building an internal tool, or coding something for your own personal use..I'm sure there are more –  vsync Feb 15 '12 at 14:18
1  
If you actually wanted it to act like one of the jQuery event handlers (like click, for example), that should be method.call(this, e); instead of method(); That way, method gets the correct value for this and also has the event object passed to it correctly. –  Jeremy T Apr 27 '12 at 18:44
    
@JeremyT that is true... you could handle the callback in any way you want ^_^ –  Neal Aug 20 '12 at 13:14
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$("#element").live('click', function(e) {
  if( (!$.browser.msie && e.button == 0) || ($.browser.msie && e.button == 1) ) {
       alert("Left Button");
    }
    else if(e.button == 2){
       alert("Right Button");
    }
});
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1  
is this msie-specific? ie is it portable across other browsers? –  Taryn East Mar 4 '10 at 11:34
11  
This method is now unnecessary as event.which has been introduced which eliminates cross browser compatibility. –  Acorn Apr 28 '10 at 0:13
7  
I suspect event.which actually eliminates cross browser incompatibility, but that's just me. –  DwB Jan 27 '11 at 17:06
    
Your link is dead... –  Neal Aug 17 '12 at 17:45
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$.event.special.rightclick = {
    bindType: "contextmenu",
    delegateType: "contextmenu"
};

$(document).on("rightclick", "div", function() {
    console.log("hello");
    return false;
});

http://jsfiddle.net/SRX3y/8/

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1  
Elegant sir... very elegant! –  Relic Sep 5 '12 at 20:54
    
Very cool answer :) –  Anther Jun 24 '13 at 15:42
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It seems to me that a slight adaptation of TheVillageIdiot's answer would be cleaner:

$('#element').bind('click', function(e) {
  if (e.button == 2) {
    alert("Right click");
  }
  else {
    alert("Some other click");
  }
}

EDIT: JQuery provides an e.which attribute, returning 1, 2, 3 for left, middle, and right click respectively. So you could also use if (e.which == 3) { alert("right click"); }

See also: answers to "Triggering onclick event using middle click"

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There are a lot of very good answers, but I just want to touch on one major difference between IE9 and IE < 9 when using event.button.

According to the old Microsoft specification for event.button the codes differ from the ones used by W3C. W3C considers only 3 cases:

  1. Left mouse button is clicked - event.button === 1
  2. Right mouse button is clicked - event.button === 3
  3. Middle mouse button is clicked - event.button === 2

In older Internet Explorers however Microsoft are flipping a bit for the pressed button and there are 8 cases:

  1. No button is clicked - event.button === 0 or 000
  2. Left button is clicked - event.button === 1 or 001
  3. Right button is clicked - event.button === 2 or 010
  4. Left and right buttons are clicked - event.button === 3 or 011
  5. Middle button is clicked - event.button === 4 or 100
  6. Middle and left buttons are clicked - event.button === 5 or 101
  7. Middle and right buttons are clicked - event.button === 6 or 110
  8. All 3 buttons are clicked - event.button === 7 or 111

Despite the fact that this is theoretically how it should work, no Internet Explorer has ever supported the cases of two or three buttons simultaneously pressed. I am mentioning it because the W3C standard cannot even theoretically support this.

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2  
so upon pressed button you get event.button === 0 which is no button clicked, brilliant IE ಠ_ಠ –  Sinan Yasar Dec 17 '12 at 19:14
    
That's in versions of IE lower than 9. –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Dec 17 '12 at 19:28
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event.which === 1 ensures it's a left-click (when using jQuery).

But you should also think about modifier keys: ctrlcmdshiftalt

If you're only interested in catching simple, unmodified left-clicks, you can do something like this:

var isSimpleClick = function (event) {
  return !(
    event.which !== 1 || // not a left click
    event.metaKey ||     // "open link in new tab" (mac)
    event.ctrlKey ||     // "open link in new tab" (windows/linux)
    event.shiftKey ||    // "open link in new window"
    event.altKey         // "save link as"
  );
};

$('a').on('click', function (event) {
  if (isSimpleClick(event)) {
    event.preventDefault();
    // do something...
  }
});
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$(document).ready(function () {
    var resizing = false;
    var frame = $("#frame");
    var origHeightFrame = frame.height();
    var origwidthFrame = frame.width();
    var origPosYGrip = $("#frame-grip").offset().top;
    var origPosXGrip = $("#frame-grip").offset().left;
    var gripHeight = $("#frame-grip").height();
    var gripWidth = $("#frame-grip").width();

    $("#frame-grip").mouseup(function (e) {
        resizing = false;
    });

    $("#frame-grip").mousedown(function (e) {
        resizing = true;
    });
    document.onmousemove = getMousepoints;
    var mousex = 0, mousey = 0, scrollTop = 0, scrollLeft = 0;
    function getMousepoints() {
        if (resizing) {
            var MouseBtnClick = event.which;
            if (MouseBtnClick == 1) {
                scrollTop = document.documentElement ? document.documentElement.scrollTop : document.body.scrollTop;
                scrollLeft = document.documentElement ? document.documentElement.scrollLeft : document.body.scrollLeft;
                mousex = event.clientX + scrollLeft;
                mousey = event.clientY + scrollTop;

                frame.height(mousey);
                frame.width(mousex);
            }
            else {
                resizing = false;
            }
        }
        return true;

    }


});
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@Nitin.Katti :- This is work up on mouse point and left button click if freeze the left button of mouse then it stop the re sizing. –  user2335866 Apr 30 '13 at 12:46
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    $.event.special.rightclick = {
     bindType: "contextmenu",
        delegateType: "contextmenu"
      };

   $(document).on("rightclick", "div", function() {
   console.log("hello");
    return false;
    });
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1  
Hi. This answer is being flagged as low quality for deletion. It seems you've added an answer to a question that was answered some time ago. Unless there is an explanation in the answer that explains how this contribution improves the accepted answer, I am inclined to vote to delete too. –  Popnoodles Jun 24 at 11:42
1  
@popnoodles, its okay but never repeat it. –  Yip Man WingChun Jun 24 at 12:06
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