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Ok, so lets say that I have a class as outlined below:

[serializable]
class foobar
{
    const int version =1;
    List<Object> Bar;

    <methods etc n stuff>
}

Ok, so quite straight forward.

Now, lets add a new member, in version 2 of the release.

[serializable]
class foobar
{
    const int version =2;
    List<Object> Bar;  
    public string NickName;


    <methods etc n stuff>
}

Ok, so now I do the really naughty thing. I decide that actually, I don't want Bar to be a list, but rather a custom list like thing, with some extra functionality, or hidden functionality. so I do this:

[serializable]
class foobar
{

    const int version =3;
    FooList BarList;  


    public string NickName;


    <methods etc n stuff>
}

Ok, this doesn't work, as is. So, I implement custom serialisation and manually set the new barlist to the deserialised list and read the nickname manually as well. So far so good, everything works.

But, now, version 4 comes along and I add another member parameter. I now have to manually serialise and manually restore all the parameters, using an ever increasingly complicated serialise and deserialise set of methods, just to support an ancient mistake that (possibly) will never actually be used

My questions are these:

Is it possible, on serialisation to call the original get object data method? That is to say, that as I understand it there is a bit of logic that does this

If(object implements ISerializable)
   object.serialize
else
   SerialzeUsingReflection(object) //The "original" way

Can I then, based on the version decide to custom deserialise, or, if I know there will be no "missing" data attributes call the original deserialise method?

in my deseralise eg

if(version ==2)
{
    ... //do all the deserialise manually
}
else
{
    CallFrameworkOriginalMethod();
}

Many thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
I know it's not a direct answer, but you might want to have a look at sharpserializer.com/en/index.html - it offers much better functionality than .NET's "native" binary serializator, and that covers maintaining backward compability which you are after. I'm sure the author would be happy to give you more information if you asked (I contacted him once and he was very helpful). I'm not personally affiliated with the project. –  Konrad Morawski Aug 21 '12 at 20:42

1 Answer 1

You can do the versioning you describe but there are two important things you need to bear in mind:

First, you should not be using the "VersionAdded" property of the OptionalFieldAttribute. On msdn they state clearly that "this property is unused and is reserved". This is important info, because first, when the framework documentation says something is reserved, you should steer clear of it. And second, the framework documentation is saying it is not used, so even if you go ahead and use it anyway, you shouldn't expect it to work. I know, there is another page on msdn that explains how "Version Tolerant Serialization" works and exactly how you should use the VersionAdded property. However this is a case of them first writing the spec of how it should work but never actually getting around to the implementation - According to the page VersionAdded should have been added with version 2.0 of .NET. This happened but no logic was associated with that property in the serialization framework. now we're on version 4.5 and that logic is still not implemented. STEER CLEAR and use something else, depending if you intend to use a third party utility like "sharpserializer" or if you are going to write this yourself.

Second, you ask if it is possible to call the original get object data method. The answer is no, when you serialize an object the only thing that is written is the state as substantiated in fields. The IL from method bodies is not included.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you've mis-understood what I was asking, I've now updated my question. –  Immortal Blue Sep 12 '13 at 9:57
    
Still your OP reads "So, .Net is clever enough to do some versioning here internally, and decode version 1 without any problems." this is NOT true. I want to make sure first of all that you understand that no versioning is happening internally. Actual versioning does not occur because the "VersionAdded" property is unused and reserved. –  Mishax Sep 12 '13 at 12:51
    
Sorry, yes, I got the point about the versioning. I had kind of assumed something odd was happening with it and that it wasn't actually storing a version value and that it was just using it to determine which sequence items were ok to be added. I had at this point decided that I would be including my own version that I would be managing. I've now updated the question to reflect the fact that using the ms versioning mechanism is stupid. –  Immortal Blue Sep 12 '13 at 13:09

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