Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Since interfaces cannot contain implementation, that seems to me to lead to code duplication in the classes that inherit from the interface. In the example below, pretend that, let's say, the first 10 or so lines that setup reading from a Stream are duplicated. Try not to focus on the wording here, but, instead focus on the concept of how easy it is to create duplicate code between each class.

For example:

public interface IDatabaseProcessor
{
   void ProcessData(Stream stream);
}
public class SqlServerProcessor : IDatabaseProcessor
{
    void ProcessData(Stream stream)
    {
      // setting up logic to read the stream is duplicated code
    }
}
public class DB2Processor : IDatabaseProcessor
{
    void ProcessData(Stream stream)
    {
      // setting up logic to read the stream is duplicated code
    }
}

I realize that using an abstract base class for ProcessData and adding non-abstract members is one solution. However, what if I really, really want to use an interface instead?

share|improve this question
8  
Why can't you use interface and abstract base class together? –  Pavel Bakshy Aug 21 '12 at 21:11
    
I think you want to use the interface when you actually want to implement it differently in different spots. –  MartyE Aug 21 '12 at 21:13
    
@PavelBakshy - what would be the point? I would just use an abstract class and define the interface members above as abstract. You missed the point I'm afraid. –  O.O Aug 21 '12 at 21:13
    
@MartyE - Yes, but I've often seen that although the implementation is different, it's not so different in that it can't have shared code between implementations. –  O.O Aug 21 '12 at 21:14
    
@O.O I think you'll just want to put the common code into its own funciton then (the abstract class could be a good place as mentioned below). –  MartyE Aug 21 '12 at 21:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The best way to share the code across interfaces is through stateless extension methods. You can build these extensions once, and use it in all classes implementing the interface, regardless of their inheritance chain. This is what .NET did with IEnumerable<T> in LINQ, for rather impressive results. This solution is not always possible, but you should prefer it whenever you can.

Another way to share logic is by creating an internal "helper" class. This looks like the right choice in your case: implementations can call the internally shared code as helper's methods, without the need to duplicate any code. For example:

internal static class SqlProcessorHelper {
    public void StreamSetup(Stream toSetUp) {
        // Shared code to prepare the stream
    }
}
public class SqlServerProcessor : IDatabaseProcessor {
    void ProcessData(Stream stream) {
        SqlProcessorHelper.StreamSetup(stream);
    }
}
public class DB2Processor : IDatabaseProcessor {
    void ProcessData(Stream stream) {
        SqlProcessorHelper.StreamSetup(stream);
    }
}

The helper class does not need to be static: if your shared methods need state, you can make your helper a regular class, and put an instance of it in each implementation of your interface where you would like to share code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for giving alternative suggestions next to 5 nearly identical answers (I mean identical to eachother, not to yours) –  Konrad Morawski Aug 21 '12 at 21:15
    
...but that can only be shared code that uses the interface, not code that helps implement it. –  Jon Aug 21 '12 at 21:15
    
@KonradMorawski They were seconds apart, most of them. Happens. –  Levi Morrison Aug 21 '12 at 21:16
1  
@O.O The "hard to test" rule is incomplete: static methods that use static state are difficult to test indeed. But stateless methods of the kind LINQ provides are very easy to test, because you provide everything you want from the outside, and you have full control, because the method does not have any state. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 21 '12 at 21:31
1  
@O.O If you do need state, you can certainly make your helper class non-static. This frees up your inheritance hierarchy from the need to inherit an abstract base, effectively replacing inheritance (which is public) with containment (which is private). –  dasblinkenlight Aug 21 '12 at 21:33

This is a case where you would want to use both an interface and an abstract base class.

The only reason you would have both is because another class would not share the abstract base code but would honor the interface. Consider:

public interface IDatabaseProcessor {
   void ProcessData(Stream stream);
}

public abstract class AbstractDatabaseProcessor : IDatabaseProcessor {
    public void ProcessData(Stream stream) {
      // setting up logic to read the stream is not duplicated
    }
}

public class SqlServerProcessor : AbstractDatabaseProcessor {
    //SqlServerProcessor specific methods go here
}

public class DB2Processor : AbstractDatabaseProcessor {
    // DB2Processor specific methods go here
}

public class NonSharedDbProcessor : IDatabaseProcessor {
    void ProcessData(Stream stream) {
      // set up logic that is different than that of AbstractDatabaseProcessor
    }
}

Syntax might be a little off, I am not a regular C# user. I came here through OOP tag.

share|improve this answer
1  
Syntax might be a little off, I am not a regular C# user. I came here through OOP tag. - ProcessData method in your abstract class should be marked as public. –  Konrad Morawski Aug 21 '12 at 21:18
    
Thanks, KonradMorawski. –  Levi Morrison Aug 21 '12 at 21:19
    
I just don't see the point in creating both, when one would suffice. (the abstract class) –  O.O Aug 21 '12 at 21:35
    
The problem with this arises when a class must implement several interfaces. –  Asad Aug 29 '13 at 2:20

As you already said, one option is using base abstract (or may be even non-abstract) class. Another option is to create another entity to run the common code. In your case it could be DataProcessor:

internal class DataProcessor
{
    public void Do(Stream stream) 
    {
        // common processing here
    }
}
public class SqlServerProcessor : IDatabaseProcessor
{
    void ProcessData(Stream stream)
    {
        new DataProcessor().Do(stream);
    }
}
public class DB2Processor : IDatabaseProcessor
{
    void ProcessData(Stream stream)
    {
        new DataProcessor().Do(stream);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

As you indicate, an abstract class provides the solution. You can use an interface if you "really, really want to;" nothing precludes it. Your abstract class should implement IDatabaseProcessor.

share|improve this answer

If you really want to not use a base class while still being able to access private and/or protected members from the shared code, then the only other option available is code generation. It's built-in VS (has been for an awful long time) and very powerful.

share|improve this answer

It is fine to have some hierachy of classes to implement an interface to share some implementation of the interface.

I.e. in your case you can move shared ProcessData code to something like ProcessorBase and derive both DB2Processor and SqlServerProcessor from it. You can decide which level implements interface (i.e. you can for whatever reason have only SqlServerProcessor to implement IDatabaseProcessor interface - it will still pick up ProcessData from base class as implementation of interface).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I've done that before, it just seems like an extra step. Why not just start with an abstract class in the first place? That just seems to be working around an interface, kind of a hack. –  O.O Aug 21 '12 at 21:18
    
Interfaces are more flexible if you have multiple distinct implementations. I.e. if you ever decide to write tests for classes that use DatabaseProcessor (implemented as base class) you'll find that it is hard to implement test version of your base class (unlike interfaces). –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 21 '12 at 21:31

Just use interfaces WITH an abstract base class:

public interface IDatabaseProcessor
{
   void ProcessData(Stream stream);
}
public abstract class AbstractDatabaseProcessor : IDatabaseProcessor
{
    public virtual void ProcessData(Stream stream)
    {
      // setting up logic to read the stream is duplicated code
    }
}
public class SqlServerProcessor : AbstractDatabaseProcessor
{
    public void ProcessData(Stream stream)
    {
        base.ProcessData(stream);

        // Sql specific processing code
    }
}
public class DB2Processor : AbstractDatabaseProcessor
{
    public void ProcessData(Stream stream)
    {
        base.ProcessData(stream);

        // DB2 specific processing code
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Corrected, thanks :) –  Warappa Aug 21 '12 at 21:13
    
I'd rather make the ProcessData() non virtual with some implementation (for example those shared 10 lines) that calls at some point an abstract method that has to be implemented by all derived (non-abstract) classes. Also mark your DatabaseProcessor as abstract since you shouldn't be allowed to instantiate this one. –  Styxxy Aug 21 '12 at 21:14
1  
ProcessData should be virtual to prevent hiding. –  Daniel Mann Aug 21 '12 at 21:18
    
But why? What's the point of using both? I mean isn't that just working around the interface? I would never do it this way if I had a choice. I would just start with an abstract class to begin with. –  O.O Aug 21 '12 at 21:25
    
I.e. you have an interface to implement (and not only one but many implementations) or you expose an interface so others can implement it their way. For your implementations you create an abstract base class to share some code you otherwise would have to copy. Lets take the upper example: you design an data abstraction layer and expose an interface for specific dialects but implement the SQL and DB2 ones yourself with code shared in an abstract class. Others don't rely on your abstract base type and just roll their own internal logic. –  Warappa Aug 21 '12 at 21:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.