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Let us say I have a Service

public interface IAreaService
{
   int CalculateArea(int x,int y);
   int CalculateAreaTimesX(int x, int y, int ammount);
}

public class AreaService : IAreaService
{
    public int CalculateArea(int x,int y)
    {
        return x*y;
    }

    public int CalculateAreaTimesX(int x, int y, int ammount)
    {
        return CalculateArea(x, y)*ammount;
    }
}

With the relevant Unit tests

[TestMethod]
    public void AreaService_GetArea_Test()
    {
        AreaService service = new AreaService();
        int expected = 9;
        int actual  = service.CalculateArea(3, 3);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected,actual,"The Calculate area does not work as expected");
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void AreaService_GetAreaMultiplyByX_TestTrueValue()
    {
        AreaService service = new AreaService();
        int expected = 27;
        int actual = service.CalculateAreaTimesX(3, 3, 3);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected,actual);
    }

Ok, so after running the Unit tests. I am sure that my method in question is working and life should be great.

But now I want to use the IAreaService in another class, and this is where i lose the light. Here is the implementation of the other class.

public class PriceCalculatorService
{
    private readonly IAreaService _areaService;
    public PriceCalculatorService(IAreaService areaService)
    {
        _areaService = areaService;
    }


    public double GetPrice(int x, int y, int times, double price)
    {
       return  _areaService.CalculateAreaTimesX(x, y, times)*price;
    }
}

If I ran the following unit test (My idea might be wrong on mocking here, and this is where the question comes in.

[TestMethod]
    public void PriceCalculatorService_GetPrice_Test()
    {
        var IAreaServiceMock = new Mock<IAreaService>();
        IAreaServiceMock.Setup(ism => ism.CalculateAreaTimesX(2, 2, 2)).Returns(8);
        PriceCalculatorService priceCalc = new PriceCalculatorService(IAreaServiceMock.Object);

        double expected = 20;
        double actual = priceCalc.GetPrice(2, 2, 2, 2.50);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected,actual);
    }

Question

When i run all the unit tests mentioned above then everything is good. All of them pass. But let us say i need for some reason to change the AreaService.Calculate() method to the following

public int CalculateArea(int x,int y)
{
    return x*y+2;
}

This means that my Unit test "AreaService_GetArea_Test()" will fail, like it should, but because of the Mocking used in the "PriceCalculatorService_GetPrice_Test()" test will still pass, because it seems that when you mock a Service then the actual code is not used(obviously). So my PriceCalculatorService_GetPrice_Test is useless. But I use a stub then the unit test will fail, because it should.

So when to Mock, and when not to Mock ?

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1  
But that's the idea of testing units. You are testing separate units, in isolation. Your AreaService_GetArea_Test will fail and that's what matters - you will see immediately which unit doesn't work properly. How would it be better if it caused a cascade of 10 fails and you'd still have to debug the whole code to identify "who's fault it is"? Wouldn't it defeat the very purpose of unit testing? :) –  Konrad Morawski Aug 21 '12 at 21:26
    
true, the light is slowly but surely coming on. It is a very big mindset change to do things this way, after you have just coded away on problems before. But I am sure it is well worth it. Thanks. –  Captain0 Aug 21 '12 at 21:43
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So my PriceCalculatorService_GetPrice_Test is useless.

No it's not. It's testing the code of GetPrice, and only the code of GetPrice. Seems reasonable to me.

There's not a lot to test in that method, but you are testing it. It would be better if you didn't have the same argument three times (using 1, 2, 3 would be better, for example) but you're testing it.

There's no reason why that test should break just because an implementation of the interface changed. You caught the change to AreaService in AreaService_GetArea_Test(), which is indeed where you should have caught it.

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My concern is just, that when another developer changes the method, then he will see that the Test fails, but because in his mind, it is the way to go, he will change the unit test to accommodate for his change. This will mean that all the other tests will be wrong, because they are Mocking this test. –  Captain0 Aug 21 '12 at 21:27
    
@Captain0: It depends what the change is for. If it's a change which goes against the contract of the interface, then the implementation is broken. If it's a change within the interface, it's not a problem. –  Jon Skeet Aug 21 '12 at 22:34
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PriceCalculatorService_GetPrice_Test is testing GetPrice. It is testing if the return value of GetPrice is _areaService.CalculateAreaTimesX(x, y, times) multiplying price. That is the meaning of the test. So it's not useless at all.

GetPrice should depend on the result of CalculateAreaTimesX, not the logic of that method. So whatever the mock returns, it's all right for the test.

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